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Maty £Ua (fllmote 

MANAGING EDITOR 

rtedetic/c William Weidmann 

BUSINESS MANAGER 



IN MEMORIAM 

WlUlam J-ennox 

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The 1937 

Pike5 Peak 

A/ugget 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE 

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS 

OF 

COLORADO COLLEGE 



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ace 



A COLLEGE YEAR WHEN IT HAS PASSED SEEMS 
TO LEAVE IN MEMORY'S CINEMA AN ALL TOO 
RAPID SUCCESSION OF PICTURED HAPPENINGS. 
AND SO IT IS THAT WE PRESENT THIS SLOWER 
MOVING RECORD, PAGE BY PAGE— THE DETAILS 
CLEARER HERE THE MAKERS OF THIS HISTORY 
CAUGHT AND HELD IN PICTURED QUIETUDE. IF 
THIS SLOW MOTION RECORD BRINGS TO YOU IN 
DAYS THAT ARE TO COME A SECOND THRILL OF 
REENACTMENT. A QUICKENING TO LIFE OF HALF 
FORGOT EXPERIENCE. OUR TASK WILL BE WELL 
DONE AND OURS THE GLORY IN THE PLEASURES 
BROUGHT TO YOU. 



Content* 

FACULTY 

CLASSES 

PICTORIAL 

ATHLETICS 

FRATERNITIES 

SORORITIES 

HONORARY 

LEGISLATION 

PUBLICATIONS 

CAMPUS 

ADVERTISEMENTS 



TO JO E. IRISH, WHOSE HELP AND 
ENCOURAGEMENT HAS MADE A 
SUCCESS OF ALL STUDENT AC- 
TIVITIES IN WHICH HE HAS HAD 
A PART, WE DEDICATE 
THIS 1937 NUGGET 







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-Hdmlnilttation 



THURSTON J. DA VIES 

A.B. Princeton 1916 

L. L. D. Denver University 1936 

Headmaster of Nichols School 1925-1929. 
Served during the World War with the Fifth 
Regiment of the United States Marines, as 
second lieutenant, first lieutenant, and captain. 
Received the Croix de Guerre and a citation in 
General Orders No. 88, second division for un- 
usual ability and courage. 

President of Colorado College 1934- 




JAMES G. McMURTRY 

B. A. Wabash College 1893 

M.A.Wabash College 1895 

Ph. D. Wabash College 1898 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Eta Sigma Phi 

Phi Gamma Mu 

Who's Who in America 

Dean of Shove Chapel 1930 

W. W. POSTLETHWAITE 

M. A. Colorado College 

1928 

Treasurer 1911 




CHARLIE B. HERSHEY 

A. B. University of Illinois 1914 
A. M. University of Illinois 1921 

Ed. D. Harvard 1923 

L. H. D. Colorado College 1934 

Dean of Colorado College 

Instructor of Education 





LOUISE W. FAUTEAUX 

B. A. Colorado College 1904 

M. R. E. Boston University 

1925 

Phi Beta Kappa 

National Association of 

Deans of Women 

American Association of 

University Women 

Dean of Women 1929 

THOMAS HOWARD 
RAWLES 

B. A. Indiana 1919, 

M. A. 1925 

Ph. D. Yale 1927 

Dean of Freshmen 1935- 



WILLIAM V. LOVITT 

B. A. University of Nebraska 

1903 
M. A. University of Chicago 

1907 

Ph. D. University of Chicago 

1914 

Sigma Xi, Delta Epsilon 

Dean of Men 1928 



JOSEPHINE MORROW 

B. A. Kansas University 

1906 

Registrar 1910 



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Professor Guy Albright 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Professor Ralph J. Gilmore, Chairman 

Professor William A. Blakely 



The work of the School of Arts and Sciences deals with the undergraduate 
in his first two years of college work. Satisfactory completion of the two year's 
work in this school entitles the student to the degree of Associate of Arts. This 
school provides for the student who does not intend to pursue any special line 
of work, as well as giving a broader foundation to the student intending to 
enter an advanced school of the College or a professional school. A great deal 
of freedom is allowed the entering student on selecting his own course of 
study. 



School ok Jlettei5 and 7ine -@tt5 






EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Professor Albert H. Daehler, Chairman 



Professor Charles T. Latimer 



Proles 



Herbert E. Mierow 



FACULTY 
DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND APPLIED RELIGION 

James G. McMurtry, Ph. D., Dean of Shove Memorial Chapel and Professor of Biblical 
Literature 

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

H. E. Mierow, Ph. D., Moses Clement Gile Professor of Classical Languages and Literature 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Albert H. Daehler, A. B., Bemis Professor of English 

Amanda M. Ellis, A. M., Associate Professor of English 

George J. Ranson, Assistant Professor of English 

Milton Sawyer Rose, A. M., Assistant Professor of English 

Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., A. B., Director of Dramatics and Instructor in English 

George S. McCue, Instructor in English 

Desmond Powell, Ph. D.. Assistant Professor on leave of absence 

Jack F. Lawson, Instructor in Journalism 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Charles T. Latimer, A. M., Professor of Romance Languages 

Mark Skidmore, Ph. D., Professor of Romance Languages 

Annamarie B. Sutton, A. B., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

Rebekah M. Hartness, A. M., Associate Professor of French and German 

Frank M. Chambers. Ph. D., Instructor in Romance Languages 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Stanley B. Lothrop, General Director of Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center 

Boardman Robinson (Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center), Art Director and Instructor in 

Life Drawing, Painting and Modeling 
Warren Chappell, Instructor in Applied Graphic Arts 
Charlotte Learning, Professor of the History of Art and Art Appreciations 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

James Sykes, M. A., Director of Musical Organization and Instructor in Piano 

Edward D. Hale, A. M., Mus. D., Dean and Professor of the Theory and Literature of Music 

Silvia Bagley, Instructor in Voice 

Frederick Boothroyd, Organist and Choirmaster of Shove Memorial Chapel 

Myrtle Bridges, Instructor in Public School Music and Progressive Series Piano 

Edwin A. Dietrich, Instructor in Violin 

Maria Fielding, Director of Dance 

Fred Fink, Director of the Band 

Beryl Griswold, Instructor in Pianoforte 

Fanny A. Tucker, Instructor in Voice and the Art of Singing 

Mrs. Victor Paige, Instructor in Artistic Speech 

Louise Fielding Kampf, Librarian 



UcltooL on jfociat Science* 





EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Professor W. Lewis Abbott, Chairman 

Professor Edith C. Bramhall Professor Carroll B. Malone 

FACULTY 

JUDSON M. BEMIS DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND BANKING 

David W. Crabb, M. F., C. P. A., Professor of Business Administration and Banking 
Melvin Weimer, A. B., M. B. A., Instructor in Business Administration 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

W. Lewis Abbott, L. L. D., Ph. S., Professor of Economics and Sociology 
Bradford J. Murphey, M. D., Professor of Mental Hygiene 
Alice E. van Diest, A. M., Assistant Professor in Sociology 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Carroll B. Malone, Ph. D., Professor of History 
George L. Anderson, A. B., M. A., Ph. D., Instructor in History 

John Campbell, John and Harriet Parker Campbell Professor of American Constitutional 
History 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Edith C. Bramhall. Ph. D., Professor of Political Science 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

William A. Blakely, M. S., Ph. D., Associate Professor of Psychology 

S. S. S. Browne, B. Lift., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Mrs. Charles F. Roos, A. B., Ph. D., Research Associate in Psychology 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Charlie Brown Hershey, M. A., Ed. D., Dean and Professor of Education 
John S. Jordan, A. M., Associate Professor of Education 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Jacob Swart, L. L. D., A. M., Professor of Econometrics 

Charles F. Roos, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Econometrics 

LECTURERS 

W. W. Postlethwaite, A. M., Anthropology 

Mrs. Dorothy P. Hulbert, Editor of Stewart Commission Publication 



School ok Matutal Science* 





EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Professor Paul E. Boucher, Chairman 

Professor Charles H. Sisam Professor Charles W. T. Penland 

FACULTY 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Frank William Douglas, Ph. D., Verner Z. Reed Professor of Chemistry 
Otis Avery Barnes, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Lowell Vernon Coulter, B. S., Instructor in Chemistry 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Ralph J. Gilmore, Ph. D., Professor of Biology 

Charles W. T Penland, Ph. D., Professor of Botany 

William C. Service, M. D., Instructor in Biology 

Charles H. Boissevain, M. D., Visiting Research Professor of Biology 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Henry E. Mathias, A. M., Associate Professor of Geology 
Luther S. Robbins, G. E., Instructor in Geology 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

Frank M. Okey, C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Charles H. Sisam, Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics 

William V. Lovitt, Ph. D., Dean of Men and Professor of Mathematics 
Guy H. Albright, Ac. D., Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
Martha C. Belschner, A. M., Instructor in Mathematics 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Paul E. Boucher, Ph. D., Professor of Physics 
Howard M. Olson, A. M., Instructor in Physics 
William F. Drea, M. D., Lecturer in X-Ray 



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President 

ALFRED J. CRONK, Economics, Grand Junction. Colo.— 
Beta Theta Pi. President 3; A. S. C. C. Council 4: President 
Senior Class; Red Lantern Club 4: Football 1; Interfraternitv 
Council 2. 3; Tiger Managerial Staff 1. 2. Manager 3; 
Booster Club's Scholarship. 

Vice-President 

LEONARD VON BIBRA SUTTON, Political Science, Colo- 
rado Springs— Vice-President Senior Class; International 
Relations Club 1. 2. President 4; German Club 1, 2. Presi- 
dent 3: History Club 1. 2; First Voters Club 4. President 4; 
Forensic Society 4; Tiqer Special Foreign Correspondent 3; 
Pikes Peak Ski Club; German Research Scholarship; Deut- 
sches Ausland Institut 1935-36. 

Secretary 
ALICE LOUISE GARY, Sociology, Chickasha. Oklahoma- 
Gamma Phi Beta; Secretary Senior Class; Tiger Club 2. 3. 
Secretary 4; W. A. A. 2, 3; Choir 2; Vice-President Q. A. 
4; Glee Club 3; Oklahoma College for Women. 

Treasurer 

GEORGE THATCHER VILLARS. Business, Denver. Colo. 

—Sigma Chi; Treasurer Senior Class; Growler's Club 2. 3. 

4; Track 2. 3: Wrestling 2. 3. 4; Manager Junior Prom; 



Jo Spring 



RALPH DALE ASHBAUGH, Biology, Colorado Springs- 
Kappa Sigma; Growler's Club; Dog Club; German Club 1, 
2; Tiger 1; U. of Wyoming. 

WILLIS EDWARD ARMSTRONG. Physics, Colorado 
Springs— Phi Gamma Delta: "C" Club; Camera Club: Poly- 
technic Club; Dog Club 1; Football 1; Tennis 2, 3. 4; Tiger 

2. 3. Business Manager 4; Ski Club 4; Manager Regit 
Teggun. 

TILTON MARSHALL BARRON, Political Science, Colorado 
Springs— Beta Theta Pi; History Club 1. 2. 3. 4; Inter- 
national Relations Club 1. 2. 3. 4; Tiger Managerial Staff 
3: Scholarship 2. 3, 4. 

MARY LILY BLEDSOE, Chemistry, Colorado Springs- 
German Club 1. 2; Tiger Club 4: Campus Club 2. 3. 4: 
W. A. A. 2; Q. A.. President 4; Hall Council 3: A. W. S. 
Board 4: Freshman Scholarship 1. War Memorial Scholar- 
ship 2. 3. 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 

SUSAN FRANCES BRAERTON, Education. Denver. Colo. 
Delta Gamma; Vice-President Junior Class; German Club 

3. 4; Tiqer 1. 2. 3. 4: Panhellenic Council 3, 4: Tiqer 
Editorial Staff 1. 2; A. W. S. Board 2. 4; Q. A. 3; Skelton 
Award. 

CONRAD MYNDERUP BROWN, Botany, Colorado Springs 
—Botany Club 2. 3. 4; Glee Club 2. 3; Swimming 1. 2: 
Tiger Editorial Staff 1: Choir 1. 2. 3. 4; Hawley Scholar- 
ship 1. 2. 3. 4: Phi Beta Kappa. 

DANIEL HOUSTON BUCHANAN, Biology, Chapel Hill. 
North Carolina— Phi Gamma Delta; Dog Club 3, 4; Football 
1; Track 2; Nugget Snapshots Editor: Louise Mary van Diest 
Scholarship 3: William C. Argo Scholarship 4: Faculty 
Student Discussion Group; George Washington University 
1933-34. 

RONALD JAMES CHAPMAN, Chemistry, Colorado Springs 
—German Club; van Diest Scholarship 3; War Memorial 
Scholarship 4. 

CHARLINE AUDREY CLARK, Art, Palmer Lake. Colo- 
Campus Club 2. 3. 4; Tiger Club 4; Inkas 1: W. A. A. 1. 
2, 3: Freshman Scholarship 1, Marie Wiley Loud 3. 4. 

VIRGINIA MARBLE COLLISSON, English, Denver, Colo.— 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Tiger Club 3. 4: Denver University 
1933-35 

HOBART M. CORNING, JR., Biology, Colorado Springs- 
Phi Gamma Delta: Red Lantern Club 4; German Club 1. 2; 
Football 1. 2; Interfraternity Council 3, 4: Manager Home- 
coming 3. 




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)EAN CATHERINE CRAWFORD. Sociology. Colorado 
Springs— Ph. Beta Kappa 4; Campus Club 2. 3. 4: W. A. A. 
1. 2, 3; Choir I, 2. 3. 4: Freshman Scholarship 1; Perkins 
Scholarship 3. 4; Currier Scholarship. 

IOHN MARSHALL DICKEY, Business, Phillyssburg. Kansas 
—Sigma Chi; Alpha Kappa Psi 1. 2. 3. President 4; Tiger 
Editorial Staff 1, 2; Manager Student Handbook 3; Tau 
Kappa Alpha 4; Debate 3. 4; Bethany College. 

TOM BEN DILLINGHAM, Economics, Colorado Springs- 
Beta Theta Pi; Red Lantern Club; "C" Club 2. 3. 4; Foot- 
ball 1, 2, 3. 4; Tennis 3. 4; Interfraternity Council 2; 
Manager Football Program 3. 4; Special Scholarship 2. 
Everett Jackson Scholarship 3. Ingersol Scholarship 4. 

MARY GAYLE DOWSON, Romance Languages, Colorado 
Springs— Campus Club 3. 4; German Club 3; French Club 
3. 4; Spanish Club 3. 4; Choir 2, 3. 4; Sponsor Committee; 
Shearer Scholarship 3. Colorado College Club of Denver 
Scholarship 4; Opera Club 3. 4; Reed College 1933-34; Phi 
Beta Kappa. 

LUZILLA FRANCIS EUBANK, Sociology, Colorado Springs 
—Kappa Kappa Gamma; Tiger Club 3. 4; Glee Club 3: 
Tiger Editorial Staff 1, 4; Managing Editor Student Hand- 
book 4; Nugget 1. 2. 3. 4. Associated Editor 2, 3. 

MARJORIE RACHEL FENDER, Sociology, Grand Junction. 
Colo.— Gamma Phi Beta; W. A. A. 3. 4; Campus Club 3; 
Tiger Club 4; Southern College 1933-34; Grand Junction 



Coll 



1934- 



Repr 



MARY ELIZABETH FIGGE. Biology, Silver Cliff. Colo.— 
Gamma Phi Beta; Dog Club 1; Tiger Club 1; W. A. A. 
1. 2, 3, 4; Freshman Scholarship; Goucher College 1935-36. 

GEORGE BALLINGALL FISHER, Economics, Colorado 
Springs— Kappa Sigma; Growler's Club 2. 3. 4: Alpha Kappa 
Psi 3. 4; Golf 1. 2: Interfraternity Council 3; Band I, 2. 3. 

ELYNOR SUE GALLOWAY, Education, Corte:. Colo- 
Gamma Phi Beta; Tiger Club 3, 4; Orchestra 1; Alice Bemis 
Taylor Scholarship 3; Currier Scholarship 4; Euterpe 1. 2; 
Student Government 1 ; W. A. A. 

MARY LAWTON GILMORE, Psychology, Colorado Springs 
— Kappa Kappa Gamma, President 4; Tiger Club 2, 3. 4; 
German Club 3. 4; Panhellenic Council 2. 3. 4, Treasurer 4; 
Nugget Editorial Staff 2. 3; Taylor Scholarship. Hibbard 
Scholarship; A. W. S. Board 1. 2. 3, 4. 

ROBERT CLAIR GLEW, Geology, Colorado Springs- 
Lambda Chi Alpha; A. S. C. C. Council. Manager 2; 
Treasurer Freshman Class 1; Tiger Managerial Staff 2; 
Growler's Club; Red Lantern Club; I 
Fraternity National Convention 3 

KENNETH CHARLES HALL, Economics, Denver. Colo.— 
—Phi Delta Theta; A. S. C. C. Council. Junior Representa- 
tive 3. President 4; President Sophomore Class;"C"Club; 
Question Club; Red Lantern Club; Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4; 
Baseball 3. 4; Interfraternity Council 2. 3. 4: Manaqcr 
Magna Pan Pan 2; Undergraduate Committee for Student 
Union Building: Freshman Scholarship 1. Robert Argo 
Scholarship 4; Sigma Delta Psi. Alpha Kappa Psi. 

LUCILLE HAMPTON, Economics, Monte Vista, Colo.— 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Tiger Club 1. 2. 3; Hawley. Frances 
Rouse. David Hume. Rice. Clark Scholarships; Q. A. 1, 2. 
President 3; A. W. S. Board 2. 3. 4. Secretary 2: Junior 
Counsellor; Skelton Award. 

MARTHA FRANCES HOWELL, Education, Colorado 
Springs— Delta Gamma; Secretary A. S. C. C. Council 3; 
Tiger Club 2. 3. 4; Nugget Editorial Staff 2. Editor 3: 
Assembly Committee 3; Financial Committee 3; Woman's 
Educational Society Scholarship. 

RUTH ANN JOHNSON, Education, Colorado Springs- 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Tiger Club 4; W. A. A. 1; Color'ado 
State College of Education 1935-36. 

MARGARET ELIZABETH KELLEY, Botany, Colorado 
Springs— Campus Club 2. 3; Euterpe: Botany Club 2, 3. 4; 
Quackenbush Scholarship 3. 4. Danford Scholarship 4. Piano 
Scholarship 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 

BEN HARRISON KIRBY, Chemistry, Colorado Springs- 
Lambda Chi Alpha; German Club 1. 2: Growler's Club 2, 
3. 4: Football 1; Track 1. 2; Wrestling 1; Interfraternitv 
Council 3. 4. 

PAULINE KIMI KURACHI, Chemistry, Brighton. Colo.— 
Campus Club 2. Vice-President 3. Secretary 4; German 
Club 1, 2: Tiger Club 3, 4; W. A. A. 1. 2. 3, 4: Fresh- 
man Scholarship 1. Hawley Scholarship Fund 2, 3. 4. 



MURRAY OTTO LORENZ, History, East Orange. New 
Jersey— Kappa Sigma; Red Lantern Club 4; History Club 
3. 4; International Relations Club 1. 2. 3; Growler's Club 
1. 2. 3. 4; Incas 1: Pistol Club 3. 4: Junior Chamber of 
Commerce 3; Tennis 1. 2. 3. 4; Nuqqet Manaqerial Staff 2. 
Manager 3; War Memorial Scholarship. 

ss, Denver. Colo.— Sigma 
Club 2. 3. 4; Tiger 1, 3. 4. 

RUTH FRANCILE MARTIN, Sociology, Colorado Springs- 
Gamma Phi Beta: A. S. C. C. Council 4; Tiger Club 4; 
Dog Club 1, 2; W. A. A. 1, 2. 3. 4. President 3; A. W. S. 
3. President 4; Freshman Scholarship 1. Student Aid Fund 
3. Ruth Loomis Scholarship 4. 



JACK ARTHUR MIDDLE, Biology, Colorado Spr 
share 3. 4; Choir 1, 2. 3. 4; Hawley Scholarship 
Dog Club 2, 3. 

HERBERT FRANK NEWHALL, Physics, Colora 
—Phi Beta Kappa; German Club 1, 2; Choir 1, 
Sharp Scholarship 2. Perkins Prize 3. 4. 



BLANCHE W. NOLAN, English, Manitou Springs. Colo.— 
Delta Gamma; A. W. S. 3. 4; German Club 3. 4: Nuqget 
Editorial Staff 3; Woman's Education Society Scholarship 
4; Colorado Woman's College 1. 2; Phi Beta Kappa. 

:olo.— A. W. S. 



MARTHA LOUISE PHILLIPS, Sociology, San Diego. C 
fornia— Kappa Kappa Gamma; Tiger Club 4; San Dr 
State College 1933-35. 



CHARLES KEITH RIDDOCH, Business Administration, Colo- 
rado Springs— Beta Theta Pi; Interfraternity Council 2. 3. 
4; Tiger 1; Business Manager Koshare 2. 3. 4; Koshare 1. 
2. 3. 4; Roland Jackson, H. G. Wells, and William Jack- 
son Scholarships. 

EDYTH MARGUERITE RIDGE, Mathematics, Colorado 
Springs— Gamma Phi Beta, President 4; Tiger Club 2. 3. 4; 
Secretary Panhellenic Council 4; Tiger 3; Nugget Editorial 
Staff 3; A. W. S. Board 4. 

JIMMY ALBERT ROBERTS, Economics, Woodmen. Colo — 
Sigma Chi; "C" Club 3. 4; Baseball 1, 2. 3, 4; Football 1; 
Basketball 2. 



RICHARD CLARK RODGERS. Biology, Cc 



Koshare 2. 3. 4; Choii 
4; Dog Club 1. Pr 



3. 4; Hawley Scholarship 



RONALD JOSEPH ROLPH, Biology, San Francisco. Ca 
fornia— Beta Theta Pi; Growlers Club: Dog Club 2. 3. 
Alpha Kappa Psi; German Club 1. 2. 3; Interfratern, 
Council 3. 4; Tiger 1. 2; Nugget 1. 2; Koshare 4; Dem 
University 2. 

MIRIAM BARETS ROTHGERBER, Sociology, Denver. Co 
—Kappa Alpha Theta; Manaqer Horse Show 3; Vice-Pre 
dent Class 1. 2; A. S. C. C. Council 4; Tiger Club 
Q. A. 2. 4; Panhellenic Council 2, 4. 



JOSEPH JOHN RUSTIN, Biology, Newton Centre. Massa- 
chusetts—Phi Gamma Delta; A. S. C. C. Council 4: Red 
Lantern Club: "C" Club; Doq Club; Wrestling 1. Golf 2. 
3; Interfraternity Council 4: Koshare 1. 2. 

ELIZABETH DEWING SECREST (Mrs.), Sociology, Prince- 
ton. New Jersey— Packer Junior College. 

ISABEL SEELEY, History, Colorado Springs— Campus Club 
2. 3: History Club 2. 3. 4. President 3; Chairman Women's 
Interest Committee: Sinclair Scholarship 3. 4; A. W. S. 
Board 3. 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 





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CHARLES MILNER SHAKESPEARE, Economics, Alamosa, 
Colo.— Kappa Sigma; Intcrf ratern.ty Council 4; Red Lantern 
Club 4; Growlers Club 3. 

MARCUS O. SHIVERS, Jr., English, Colorado Springs- 
Phi Gamma Delta; Question Mark Club I, 2, 3, 4; Inter- 
fraternity Council 2: Koshare 1. 2, 3. President 3. 

DORIS ELAINE SHOCK, Chemistry, Colorado Springs- 
Gamma Phi Beta; Phi Beta Kappa; Tiger Club 3, 4; Dog 
Club 3. 4; Henry Stron Scholarsh.p 3. 4; A. W. S. Board 2, 4. 



LAIRD KEY SMITH, Enql.sh, Grand Junction, Colo.— Phi 
Gamma Delta; A. S. C. C. Council 1; Growlers Club; 
Sw.mming; T.ger 2. 3. Editor 4; Nugqet Editorial Staff 4: 
Rotary Representative 1: Grand Junction State Junior 
College. 

RALPH AMON SMITH, Pre-Medicine, Biology, Colorado 
Springs — Carpenter Scholarship 3. 4; Dog Club. 



ORVILLE BURTON TRAINOR. Business, Colorado Springs 
—Kappa Sigma; President Newman 2: "C" Club 2; Football 
2; Sports Editor Nugget 2; Business Manager Student Hand- 
book: Band 3; Orchestra 3; McLeisch Scholarship; Regis 
College 1933-34. 

LUELLA BERTA TROTTER, Art, Colorado Springs— Gam- 
ma Phi Beta; Tiger Club 2, 3. 4; A. W. S. Board 3; Pan- 
hellenic Council 3. 

ELEANOR KATHRYN TRUMBULL, Business, Denver. Colo. 
—Campus Club 2. 3. President 4; Tiger Club 3. 4; Glee 
Club 3. 4; Choir 1, 2; A. W. S. Board 2. 4. 



WILLIAM DEAN TUDOR. Business Adn 

Banking, Colorado Springs — Kappa Sigma; Growlers Club 
2; Pistol Club; Alpha Kappa Psi; Wrestling 1; War 
Memorial Scholarships. 

EARL WALTER UDICK, Physics, Colorado Springs— Phi 
Delta Theta; Red Lantern Club 4; Manager Junior Prom 3; 
Koshare 1. 2. 3. President 4; Band 1.2, 3. 4. 



JANE LENORE WAHTOLA, Fine Arts. Colorado Springs- 
Euterpe 1. 2. 4; Campus Club 2; Tiger 2; Choir 1. 2; Maria 
Fielding Special Dancing Scholarship. Augusta D. Swart 
Earle and Rouse Scholarships 1, 2. 3. 4. 

WALTER LOCK WOOD WELDON, English, Loveland. 
Colo.— Kappa Sigma; Koshare 3. 4; Trustee Scholarship 3; 
International Relations Club 3; Faculty Discussion Group 4; 
Chaffey Junior College 1. 2. 



CARL SWARTZ, Jr., Biology, Pueblo, Colo.— Phi Del 
Theta; Red Lantern Club; "C" Club; Sigma Delta P; 
President Growlers Club 4; Football 2; Baseball 3. 4: Inte 
fraternity Council 2. 3. 4; Koshare 3. 4; Freshmen Schola 
ship. Slocum Scholarship. 



JAMES HERBERT SINTON, Business, Colorado Springs- 
Chi Phi; Alpha Kappa Psi 1; Ski Club; Football 3, 4; Dart 



JEAN MAY WINSTON, History, Colorado S P 
Club 1, 2. 3, 4; International Relations Clu 
Club 1. 



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President 
WILLIAM BIBB LAMAR, Business, Selma. Alabama— Kappa 
Sigma: Treasurer A. S. C. C. Council; President Junior 
Class; Growler's Club; "C" Club; Spanish Club; Inter- 
national Relations Club; Golf 1, 2; Interfraternity Council: 
Tiger 1; Nugget Managerial Staff 1; Band Manager; Band 
1. 2. 3: Student Union Committee. 

Vice-President 
ESTHER LUCILE EDWARDS, Biology, Colorado Springs- 
Delta Gamma; Secretary Freshmen Class: Secretary Sopho- 
more Class; Vice-President Junior Class: Tiqer Club 1 . 2. 3; 
Tiger Editorial Staff 1. 2; Dog Club; Little Sisters Sponsor. 

Secretary 
PAULINE GERTRUDE ANDERSON, Romance Languages, 

Colorado Springs— Gamma Phi Beta; Secretary Junior Class: 
Tiger Club 2. 3; W. A. A. 2. 3. 

Treasurer 
EDWARD JOSEPH PELZ, Economics and Political Science, 

Scarsdale. New York— Sigma Chi; Alpha Kappa Psi: Phi 
Beta Kappa; Treasurer Junior Class; International Relations 
Club; Faculty-Student Discussion Club; Dog Club; "C" 
Club; Manaqer Football 1; Track Manager 2; Assistant 
Football Manager 2; Student Equipment Manager 2; Inter- 
fraternity Council; Debating 1. 2; Monitor Howbert House; 
Trustee Scholarship 1; Freshman Prize 1; Trustee Scholar- 
ship 2, Perkins Scholarship 3. 

PHYLLIS WICK ABDULLAH, Sociology, New York. New 
York— Gamma Phi Beta; Glee Club 3; Ski Club 3; First 
Voter's Club 3; Campus Club 3; W. A. A. Board 3; Nugget 
Editorial Staff 3; Radcliffe College 1. 2. 

FRANK FUNK ARGUST, Engineering, Colorado Springs- 
Kappa Sigma; International Relations Club 2, 3: Polytechnic 
Club 2. 3; First Voters Club 3; History Club 2; Mautner 
Scholarship 1; Los Angeles Junior College 1. 

MARY ELISABETH ASKLING, Sociology, Denver. Colo.— 
Delta Gamma: Panhellenic Council 3; Tiger 1. 2. 3: Nugget 
Managerial Staff 3. 



MARY STEARNS BARKALOW. Sociology. Denver. Co 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Tiger Club 1. 2. 3; Manager C 
Glee Club 3; Sponsor Committee 2. 3; Q. A. Board 1. 

DORIS JANE BARTON, History, Colorado Sprinqs— Ga 
Phi Beta; W. A. A. 1. 2, 3; Choir 1, 2; History Club 2 



JOHN BOYKO, Chemistry, Colorado Sprinqs— Beta The 
Pi; German Club 2; Newman Club. 

CARROLL BRYANT BULLOCK, Business Administrate 

Colorado Springs— Phi Delta Thcta; Growlers Club: Gl 
Club 2. 3; Basketball 1. 2. 3; Track; Football 1: Koshare 



JUNE MARY CHAPMAN, English, Coh 
Gamma; Glee Club 1: Tiger Club 1. 



ado Springs— Delt 



RICHARD AVON DICKISON, Chemistry, Colorado Sprinqs— 
Beta Theta Pi; German Club 2. 3; "C" Club 1. 2, 3- Tennis 
I. 3, Captain 3; Tiger 1, 2; Nugget 1. 2; Freshman and War 
Memorial Scholarships. 

RUTH LOUISE DOUGHTY, Business Administration, Nor- 
folk, Nebraska— Delta Gamma; Tiqer Club 1, 2, 3- Koshare 
I. 2. 3; A. W. S. Board 2, 3. 



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JEAN FONTIUS, Edi 

Opera Group 3; W 
College 1. 2. 


■cation, Der 

. A. A. 3; 


'elm 


Cc 


■ lo.— Delta Gamma; 
3; Bradford Junior 


BETTY JEAN GALLIGAN, 

Springs— Campus Club 1. 2. 
1. 2; Trustee and Perkins S 


Engineer 

3; T.ger 


"ci 


Science, Color 
jb 2. 3; W. A. 


ado 
A. 


GORDON GRAHAM 

Kappa Sigma: Nugge 


GALLUP, Busi 

t Managerial St; 


T ! 


i, Denver. Colo.— 
Band 2; Choir 3. 



MARGARET ANNE GAMMON, English, Calhan. Colo.- 
Delta Gamma; W. A. A.: Colorado University 1. 2. 

MARY ELLA GILMORE, Biology, Colorado Springs— Gan 
ma Phi Beta; Dog Club 1. 2, 3. Secretary 3; German Clu 
1. 2. President 2; Tiger 1, 2. 3; Nugget Staff 2. 3, Managin 
Editor 3; Manager Regit Teggun; Campus Club 1. 2. 



ALEANOR SHIRLEY HAAFE, Psychology Pueblo, Colo. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Nugget Editorial Staff. 

ADELE VIRGINIA HARTNER, German, Denver. Colo.- 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Tiger Club 3; German Club 2. 3; Con 
mittee Gold Diggers Ball; Colorado University 1. 

E. JEANNE HAUSER, Biology, Colorado Springs— Kap, 
Alpha Theta; Dog Club 1; Tiger Editorial Staff I; A. V 



JAMES ARTHUR HETHERLY, Germnn, Colorado Sprinq: 
—Lambda Chi Alpha; French Club; Spanish Club; Germar 
Club; Growlers. 

MAX1NE LUCILLE JARVIS, French, Shawnee. Oklahoma- 
Kappa Alpha Theta; French Club; Ttger Club; W. A. A. 
Oklahoma Baptist Umversity 1. 2. 

KIRK FRANKLIN JENSEN, Cheyenne. Wyoming. 



A. JOHNSON, Colorado Spring 

W. JOHNSTONE, Physics, E 

Theta Pi; Snap Shot Editor 
Scholarship 3. 

HERBERT LYLE JOLLEY, Bu 

Junction. Colo. — Kappa Sigma; 
1. 2, 3; Football 1. 2. 3.' 



ROBERT BRANSCOMB KEETON, Economics, Manzanola, 
Colo.— Phi Delta Theta; "C" Club; Football 1. 2; Baseball 
1; Interfraternity Council 3; Denver University 1934-35. 

ARTHUR FREDERIC KRUGGEL, Jr., Business, Chicago. 
Illinois— Phi Gamma Delta; Alpha Kappa Psi; Growler's 
Club; International Relations Club 1; Tiger Managerial 
Staff; Basketball Manaqer 1; Football 1; North Park Junior 
College 1934-35. 

DOROTHY MAY LAWSON, History, Colorado Springs- 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Spanish Club 2. 3; History Club 2. 
3; Glee Club 2, 3; Tiger 1. Associate Editor 2, 3: Nuqget 
Editorial Staff 3; Trustee Scholarship 1. 2; Perkins Scholar- 
ship 3; A. W. S. Board 2. 3. 



ROBERT FREDERICK LIND, Chemistry, Colorado Springs 
—Lambda Chi Alpha; Cerman Club 2; Growler's Club 2; 
Glee Club 2; Opera Group 1; Choir 1: Trustee Scholarship 
2. War Memorial Scholarship 1. 

DURWARD RUSSELL LOCKHART, Economics, Delta. Colo. 
—Kappa Sigma; "C" Club; Basketball 1. 2. 3; Baseball 1. 
2; Interfraternity Council. 

CHARLES HARRY LOVE, Business Administration, Grand 
Junction. Colo.— Kappa Sigma; "?" Club. New Mexico 
Junior College 1. 2. 



ALBERT LUSIC. Phys.es. Colorado Springs— Tr 
ship; MacLeish Scholarship. 

RUDOLPH FRANK LUSIC, Econt 

Sigma Delta Psi; Track 1; Fr 
Scholarships. 

GORDON MACLOUD MACE, Geology, Estes Park. Colo. 
— Phi Gamma Delta; Growler's Club 2. 3; Track 1. 2. 3; 
Football 1; Interfraternity Council; Ski Club President; Ski 
Team 1. 2. 3. Captain 1, 2. 3; "C" Club; Alpha Kappa Psi. 



MARGUERITE ANN McFARLAND. English, Color 
Springs — Kappa Kappa Gamma; Newman Club 1. 2, 
Glee Club 2. 3; Tiger Club 3; Vice-President A. W. 
Chairman Women's Interests Committee; Freshman, Trus 
Hypatia Scholarships. 

SAM MERCER— Kappa Sigma. 

JACK G. MURRAY, Business Administration, C o 1 o r a 
Springs— Phi Gamma Delta; Football 1; Baseball 1; Tiqei 
2, 3; Band 3; Golf 3. 



MARY VIRGINIA MUSS1-.R, Education, Washington, D. C. 
—Delta Gamma; President W. A. A. 3; Tiger; Women's 
Interest Committee; A. W. S. Board: U. C. L. A. 1934-35. 

JOSEPH FRANC NAGY. Jr., Education and Economics, 

Flint, Michiqan— "C" Club; Track 1; Freshman Football; 
Varsity Football 2. 3; Varsity Basketball 2. 3; Varsity 
Baseball 2. 3: Trustee Scholarship; General Motors Insti- 
tute of Technology 1934-35. 

ROBERT KENNETH NELSON. Chemistry, Monte Vista. 
Colo.— Phi Delta Theta: German Club 2. 3; Growlers Club 
2. 3; Koshare 2; Freshman. Trustee 2. Wells Scholarships 3. 

MARIE LOUISE OSTENDORF, Biology, Blue Island, Illinois 
—Campus Club; W. A. A.; Euterpe: Botany Club; Taylor 
and Music Scholarships; Thorton Junior College 1934-. 

ALFRED E. OWENS, Business Administration, Ft. Duchesne. 
Utah— Phi Delta Theta; A. S. C. C. Council 3; Growler's 
Club 3; "C" Club 2. 3; Baseball 2. 3; Football 1, 2; 
Manager A. S. C. C. Homecoming Dance; Student Union 
Buildinq Committee; Wells Scholarship; Westminster Jr. 
College 1. 

DALE EDGAR OWENS, Biology, Colorado Springs— Phi 
Delta Theta; Glee Club; Band 1. 2. 3; High School Scholar- 
ship 1. 2. 



FRANK WILLIAM PHELPS. Chemistry, Colorad 
—Lambda Chi Alpha; Tiack 2; Band 3. 

ELEANOR PICK, Colorado Springs— Campus Club. 

EVALYN PICK, Mathematics, Colorado Spring 
Club 1. 2, 3; Ski Club; W. A. A. 3; Trustee i 
Scholarships. 




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CLAIRE HILDA PROCTOR. Busings Administration, Colo- 
rado Springs— Kappa Kappa Gamma; A. S. C. C. Council 
2. Secretary 3; Vice-President Class 1. 2: Glee Club 1. 2: 
Tiger Club 1. 2. 3; Tiger Editorial Staff 2. 3; Student 
Union Building Committee; Trustee 1. 2. Hawley Mem- 
orial Scholarships 3; Social Chairman A. W. S. 3; Home- 



JACK ALFRED SAMWAYS, Economics and Business, I 

dena. California — Kappa Sigma; A. S. C. C. Counc 
"C" Club 2; History Club 2: Debating Club 2; Footba 
2, 3; Band 1. 2. 3; Orchestra 1. 



LOUISE DOROTHY SCHIDDEL, Sociology and Psychology. 

Colorado Springs— Campus Club 2. 3; Choir 2. 3; Opera 
Group; A. W. _S. Board 3; D. A. R. and Woman's Edu- 
cation Society Scholarships. 

MONANA HEATH SHELLENBERGER, Sociology, Colo- 
rado Springs— Delta Gamma; W. A. A. Board 3; Woman's 
Interest Committee; Goucher College 1. 



WILLIAM BERNARD SHERIDAN, Business Adminisi 
Denver. Colo.— Phi Gamma Delta; "?" Club; Gr 
Club; Baseball 1; Trustee Scholarship: Denver Univei 

MARGARET BELLE SIMPSON, Economics, Colo 
Springs — Kappa Kappa Gamma: Freshman Class Se 
1: Panhellenic Council 2; Sponsor Chairman; In' 
Committee. 



BARBETH STAFFEL, Sociology, San Antonio. Texas— Phi 
Theta Kappa; San Antonio Junior College 1, 2. 

LEE STEELE, Colorado Springs— Lambda Chi Alpha. 



JOHN ELLSWORTH STEVENSON. Philosophy, Colorado 
Springs— Growler's Club 2: President Student Ministerial 
Club; Interfraternity Basketball. Baseball; Softball; Choir I. 
2. 3; Hawley Scholarship; Debating Club 3. 

ver. Colo.— Beta Theta 



MARY ELIZABETH TRUEBLOOD, Sociology, Monte Vistz 
Colo.— Alpha Kappa Theta; Tiger Club 3; Panhelleni 
Council; Koshare 3; Stephens College 1934-35. 

GENEVIEVE MARIE WALBERG, Sociology, C o 1 o r a d 
Springs— Delta Gamma; History Club 1; Glee Club I; Tige 
Club 1. 2; Sponsor Committee; Trustee Scholarship 1. 2, J 



JAMES 
Kappa 

1. 2; 1 


BREWER WALTS, English, Ca 

Mugget Staff 2; Debating Club 1. 


non City. Colo.— 
b 1. 2; Tiger Staff 


LOUISE 

Delta 
Junior 


WARNER, Education. Seminoe 
Gamma; Glee Club 2; Tiger Staff '. 
College 1. 


Dam. Wyoming— 
>.: Q. A. 3; Weber 


FREDERICK WILLIAM WEIDMANN, 

Springs— Phi Delta Theta: Nugget Staff 
Pistol Club: Tiqer 1. 2. 3; Glee Club 1. 
Teggun; International Relations Club 1. 


Business, Colorado 
2. 3; Manager 3; 
2: Manager Regit 


JEAN WILSON, Political Science, Colora 


do Springs. 


HELEN MARGARET WOOD, Colorad 
Gamma; Tiger 2. 3; Koshare 2; West 
1934-36. 


o Springs — Delta 
ern State College 


ISABEL 

Kappa 


YANOCHOWSKI, Sociology, La 

Kappa Gamma; Northwestern Uni 


Grange. Illmois- 
versity 1. 


HOMER 
Colo.- 


! COPELAND BIGGS, Business, 
-Kappa Siqma: "?" Club 1. 2. 3; 
1 Funds Scholarship 3. 


Grand Junction. 
Football 1, 2, 3; 



FRED SIMPSON, Colorado Springs— Phi Gamma De 



BILL WOLFE, Denvc 
I, 2; Baseball 2, 3; 

"C" Club . 



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Vice-President 

JEANNE COLLISSON. Denver. Colo. 



Secretary 

MARY HARRIS. Denver, Colo 



DONALD AUTREY. Denver. Colo. 
RAYMOND BARNES. Denver. Colo. 
ELIZABETH BARTLETT. Watertown. Co 
ROBERT BEACH. Denver. Colo. 



RUTH BISCHOF, Colorado Springs 
RUTH BOATR1GHT. Colorado Spring 
HAROLD BOWMAN, Glentivar. Colo 
CHARLES BOYCE. Colorado Springs 



ROBERT BOYLE. Denver. Colo. 
LETA MARIE BRADLEY. Colorado Springs 
JEAN BRODERICK. Denver. Colo. 
CATHERINE BROWN. Las Animas. Colo. 



ROBERT BRUCE. Colorado Springs 
JACK CHELEY. Denver. Colo. 
BEVERLY CLARK. Palmer Lake. Colo. 
ELISABETH CLARK. Colorado Springs 



RUSSELL CLARK. Omaha. Nebraska 
TOM CLELAND. Longmont. Colo. 
MARJORIE COMBS. Colorado Springs 




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EVERETT CUNNINGHAM, Salida. Colo. 
JOHN DAMGAARD. Tarrytown. New York 
HOWARD D1LTS. Colorado Springs 
EDWIN DOLAN. Denver. Colo. 



LYD1A DOUTH1RT, Santa Fe. New Mex. 
ANNE EASTWOOD. Colorado Springs 
DALE ENYART. Ordway. Colorado 
JAMES FENNELL. Pueblo. Colo. 



WAYNE GALLAGHER, Salt Lake City, Utah 
PAUL GARK1E. Aurora. Colo. 
MARION GARR1TSON. Colorado Springs 
CURTIS GATES. Las Animas. Colo. 



HELEN GEORGE, Pueblo. Colo. 
LOUISE GRABOW. Denver. Colo. 
JANE GREEN. St. Augustine. Florida 
EUGENE GRIFFITH. Crowley. Colo. 



JAMES HANEY. Colorado Springs 
MARJORIE HARRINGTON. Santa Fe. N. M. 
ELISE HAYES. Colorado Springs 
BETTY HECKERT, Montrose. Colo. 



WILLIAM HENDERSON. Jackson. Mi 
WILLIAM HILLYARD. Denver. Colo. 
GERALD HOWARD. Colorado Springs 
ALICE HOWE, Longmont, Colo. 



VERNON HUNT. Denver, Colo. 
JULE HUTCHINSON, Colorado Springs 
DORIS JONES. Canon C.ty. Colo. 
JOSEPH KELLEHER, Colorado Springs 



ROBERT KELT. Littleton, Colo. 
GEORGIA LAMON. Santa Monica. Calif. 
FRANKLIN LANEBACK. Rocky Ford. Colo. 
IRMA MARKER. Colorado Springs 



GERALD MARTIN. Colorado Springs 
JAMES MASTERSON. Denver. Colo. 
RITA McCORMICK. Pueblo. Colo. 
BETTY McKEE. Las Vegas. New Me> 



VICTOR McVEY. Aurora. Colo. 
JOHN McWILLIAMS, Colorado Spr 
BETTY MELLENTHIN. Santa Ana. 
ELIZABETH MIDDLEKAUFF. Den 



JAMES MILLWARD. Colorado Spr 
MAX MOBERLY, Colorado Springs 
FELICIA MONGONE. Denver. Col 



ROSSA BLAIR MOSHER. Colorado Springs 
THEODORE MURRAY. Denver. Colo. 
JAMES NAISMITH. Watertown. Conn. 
H1LDEGARD NEILL. Colorado Springs 



LUCILLE NELSON. Monte Vista, Colo. 
DONALD NORTON. Colorado Springs 
HOLCOMBE PALMER. Denver, Colo. 



EVELYN PETERSON, Colorado Springs 
CATHERINE PHELPS. Colorado Springs 
KATHRYN RENFRO. Colorado Springs 
BERTRAM REULER, Colorado Springs 




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CAROL REWICK. Denver. Colo. 
DOROTHY RHOADS. Denver. Cole 
BETH RITTER. Denver. Colo. 
GLENN ROGERS. Colorado Springs 



FRANCIS ROUSSEAU. Otowi. New Mex. 
ROBERT SCUDDER. Salida. Colo. 
VIRGINIA SEERIE, Denver. Colo. 
WILLIAM SHEEHAN. Colorado Springs 



EDWIN SMITH. Colorado Springs 
FRED STATEN. Pueblo. Colo. 
[AMES STERLING, Canon City. Cob 
DOROTHY MAY THOMPSON. 



LEE TREECE. Colorado Springs 
1ANE UNDERH1LL. Colorado Spr 
MARY VAN LOPIK. Castle Rock. 
BERNICE VESSEY. Colorado Spr: 



VIRGINIA WATERS. Denver. Colo. 
DAVID WILKINS. Buffalo. New York 
CARL WILM. Colorado Springs 
JOSEPH WILSON. Colorado Springs 



MARC1LLE WOOD. Clayton. New Me 
CECIL WRIGHT. Lamar, Colo. 
RUTH WRIGHT. Catskill, New York 
ADELINE ZANOTTI. Gallup. New Me 



HELEN Z1CK. Grand Lake. Colo. 



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President 

GEORGE TELLER. St. Joseph. Mi: 



Vice-President 

JOANNE DAILY. Pueblo. Colo. 



Secretary 

OTHO S. NEWSOM. Jr.. Colorado Spr 

Treasurer 
BARBARA HEALEY, Elgin, Illinois 



ELIZABETH ADAMS. Denver, Colo. 
CAROLYN ALLEN, Colorado Springs 
HAROLD ANDERSON. Colorado Springs 
BETTY ANDREAE, Montrose. Colo. 



HOWARD ARMSTRONG. Mancos, Col 
BETTY ARTZ. McPhee. Colo. 
JEANIE BARKALOW. Colorado Springs 
BETTIE BARNES. Denver. Colo. 



CASWELL BECK, Salida, Colo. 
THEODORE BILLINGS. Estes Park, Co 
BETTY BLAIR. Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania 
BETTY BOERSTLER. Denver. Colo. 



WILLIAM BOYES. Colorado Springs 
HELEN BROBECK. Colorado Springs 
JANE BUTTON. Denver. Colo. 
JOHN BUTTON. Denver. Colo. 



MARY HELEN CAMERON. Fort Wayt 
JAMES CAMPBELL. Denver. Colo. 
JAMES CAPES, Denver, Colo. 
PAUL CARTER. Colorado Springs 





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MARY LOUISE CATON. Colorado Spr 
ROBERT CHAPMAN, Colorado Springs 
GERALDINE DAILY, Pueblo. Colo. 
ROBERT DAY, Colorado Springs 



MARY DE LONGCHAMP, Colorado Spr 
RAYMOND DICKISON. Colorado Spring: 
CHRISTOPHER DITSON, Denver, Colo. 
MARY ELLEN DUGGAN, Climax, Colo. 



F1F1 DULIN. Mamaroneck, New York 
FRANCES ENN1S. Denver, Colo. 
WILLIAM FLEISCHL1. Cheyenne. Wyo. 
JOHN FOWLER. Moline, Illinois 



HARRIET ANNE FRANK. Denver, Colo. 
JANE ANN GASSMAN, Pueblo, Colo. 
RUTH GILMORE. Colorado Springs 
CENOVIA GONZALES, Colorado Spring; 



Colo 

lo Spr 



DONALD GRAHAM, Dcnv 
VIRGINIA HARLAN. Colo 
GORDON HARMSTON. Roosevelt. Ut 
ELEANOR HARTER. Colorado Springs 



J, C. HAWTHORNE. Jr., Caldwell, T 
MAC HEARD. Santa Fc, New Mexico 
KELLY HEATH. Heavener, Oklahoma 
CAROLYN HENDERSON, Jackson, h 



JOHN HILL. Colorado Springs 
RICHARD HOADLEY, Milwaukee. \ 
SCOTT HOLMAN. Jr.. Chicago. Illin 
DOROTHY HOLMES, Littleton, Col. 



HELEN HOSKINS. Denver, Colo. 
WILLIAM HOVER. Colorado Springs 
JOHN HOWARD. Montcla.r, New Jers 
RICHARD HUGHES. Colorado Spring; 



BARBARA HURLEY. Denver. Colo. 
THOMAS IVORY. Salt Lake C.ty. Ut 
DOROTHY JOHNSON. Denver. Colo 
MARY LOU JOHNSON. Colorado Sr. 



BETTY JEAN JONES, Colorado Springs 
HARMON JONES. Colorado Springs 
MARJOR1E JONES. Denver. Colo. 
ARNOLD KIMMELL. Denver. Colo. 



RAYMOND KING. Jr.. Colorado Sprii 
MARY JANE KLE1NSORGE. Chicago 
CLESTA KRAMLICH. Denver. Colo. 
DOROTHY LAPHAM. Cheyenne. Wy 



LEE. Grand Island. Nebraska 
MARTHA LEMON, Colorado Springs 
BARBARA ANN LEWIS. Colorado Springs 
GEORGE LIVINGSTON, Colorado Springs 



LOIS LIVINGSTON. Santa Fe. New Me 
GREGORY LOESCH. Montrose. Colo. 
ROBERT LOSER, Center. Colo. 
KATHRYN MacLEAN, Pueblo, Colo. 



WARREN MARRIAGE. Colorado Springs 
RICHARD MACRUM. Denver. Colo. 
DONALD MAKINS. Abilene. Kansas 
THOMAS MALONE. Colorado Springs 




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MARGARET ELLEN MARTIN. 

Denver. Colo. 

GRACE EDITH MASON. Colorado Springs 

BYRON MAXWELL. Colorado Springs 

MARY ANN McBRIDE. Denver. Colo. 



BYRON McCLURE. Colorado Springs 

MARY ALICE McCONNELL. 

Colorado Spring 

DOROTHY McKEOWN. Denver. Colo. 

RICHARD MORGAN. Colorado Springs 



HAROLD MILLER. Colorado Springs 
BETTY NOLLENBERGER. Denver. Colo. 
KATHLEEN O'DONNELL. Colorado Spri 
MARGARET O'DONNELL. Colorado Spr 



EDITH PRATT. Denver. Colo. 
ISABEL PEDERSON. Chicago. Illinois 
PATRICK QUINN. Colorado Springs 
RAYMOND RAYFORD. Colorado Springs 



WILLIAM REILLY. Denver. Colo. 
LELAND R1DDOCH. Colorado Springs 
RICHARD ROBBINS. Colorado Springs 
MARGERY ROBERTS, Denver, Colo. 



CHARLES ROE. Colorado Springs 
BEN RYDER. Denver. Colo. 
EARL SARCHET, Jr.. Denver. Colo. 
GERALDINE SAVIERS, Colorado Spr 



LOUIS SHOEN. Colorado Springs 
JOHN SELLNER. Denver. Colo. 
WILLIAM SHAW. Kobe, Japan 
BERN1CE SHERWOOD. Colorado Springs 



IRVIN SHERWOOD. Colorac 
JAMES SMITH. Colorado Spr 
KAY SMITH. Denver, Colo. 
GORDON SNIDER. Los Ange 



LOIS JEAN STEVISON, Colorado Spr 
MARY ANNE STONE. Colorado Sprir 
HARRIET SUTLIFF. Denver. Colo. 
ELSIE SWENSON, Colorado Springs 



ROBERT THOMPSON. Aurora. Colo. 
MIRIAM THORNTON. Colorado Spri 
BETTY RUTH TREECE. Colorado S F 
ALLEN VANDER WEYDEN. Denver 



RICHARD VAN SAUN. Denver. Colo. 
MARY VAN WAGNEN. Denver. Colo. 
CHARLES VAN WERT. Hawthorne. N. Y 
JACK WALDEN. Colorado Springs 



BETTY LOU WALTON. Denver, Colo. 

]EAN D. WEDDINGTON. 

Randolph Field. Te 

BARBARA WHITE. Highland Park, 111. 

DORIS WHITE. Denver. Colo. 



WANETTA WHITE, Colorado Springs 

MARGARET WILKINS. Denver. Colo. 

SUE WILLIAMS. Denver. Colo. 

MILDRED LEE WILSON. 

Charles- Town. West Virgi. 



KENNETH WOODS. Longmc 
BETTY YAEGER. Longmont. 
RICHARD ZEIGLER. Blackha 
EARNEST WERNER. Chicag 



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Serenade in the Night Seerie Three Lions and the Lioness 

"Lee" Stable Equilibrium A Thorn Bctween Two Roses Trees 

Ginger" Burning the Mid-Night Oil " Bud " «* " M f^ Night Qub 



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Memories 
Mac's Harem 
Frosty" 

The Pause 



Oh! 



Snake Eyes 

Gather 'Round Me Children 

Between Halves 



Eternal Triangle 
North Cheyenne Canyon 
Up So High 
A Buffalo and a Bengal Yearling 




Dooley 
Rabbits for Lunch 

Hesitating 
The Open Season 



Slumbering 

Decapitation 

"Marc" and Fred 



The Fire Chief 

Our Director 

Indecent Exposure 



Loitering 

A Sit Downer 

Up Among the Rocks 

"Sissy" 




Fiji Trio Queens on a Throne "Gussie" and Betty Joe's Support 

Blow-Out Proof Tire Two Longs, One Short "Marge" and Clesta Kappa's Proteges 

"rue Feminine Support Roofing? At His Master's Voice "Gorgeous" No, It Isn't the Trees 

Man or Monkey? Betas D. G.'s Murray Mascots 







Combine 


Ain't Love Grand 


Polers 


Up in 


the Air Alone! 


C'mon Give 


Goal— Murray's 




Friday Noon 


Saturday Noon 


Beta Room 


Convenient, Yes 




Kay and Goog 


Holdin' Hands Aga 


il* Red Riding Hood 


Phi Bet 




Deadeye Dicks 


Early to Bed, Etc 




Tough Guys 


Now Smile 


Three Spooks 


Wash Day 


Assembly 




Inseparable 


Tsk! Tsk! 


Not So Serious 




Joe's Girls 


Sit Downers 


Drugstore Cowgirls 


Pinned Together 


Button 


Why, George 








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Hot Time 


Fiji Winners 


G Phi Winner 


Fiji's Tank Buffs 


Good Idea 


Lambda Chi Meat Market 


Yell Masters 


Kappa Astrologers 












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Sig Chi Float 

Lambda Chi's David 

The Tiger Treed The Buffalo 



Patriotic Ford 

Nightfall at the Beta Harlem 

"Horse Behind the Cart" 

Bandling 



Over the Goal Posts 

Beheading C. U. 

Winsome Witches 




Buddies 


Just Kids 






She Fell in a Faint 


Hag Sunbather 


Fire Drill 


Beauty and Beasi 


Lovely to Look At 


Mister Coy 


Sig Float 


Formal Dress 




Extremes 


G Phi Trio 


Love 


Gold Dust Twins 


Campus Dogs 


Now Boys 


in 


Contortionists 


ternal Lovebirds 


Shoot 


Bloom 


Book Worm 




UNDER A BLANKET OF WHITE" 





June Mary Chapman * 




<p * 




I 




* Jane Underhill 





Betty Mellenthin * 




Henderson - 



■Athletic* 





football 




W. T. VAN DE GRAAFF 
Director of Physical Educal 
Head Football Coach 



(?ocLcltlnG Sta-k-k 



i >\\TN ( iWKN.S 




Id Coach Graduate Manager of Athle 




-* j=re=3u 






■*■ J 


















7ootUl/936 



Colorado College ended the 1935 season with high hopes for a most suc- 
cessful season in '36 but fate in the form of scholastic eligibility, accidents, 
work and graduation, dealt a hard blow to optimistic plans. Captain Preskar 
and Ray Hess were lost through graduation. Bud Alston, Paul Simpson, and 
Jim Walsh dropped out of school. Final examinations erased four more, Jim 
Riley, Andy Mihalick (both All-conference candidates) Merle Mcjunkin, and 
Al Owens. An automobile accident ended Paul Weston's hopes for the season. 
In spite of these unprecedented and unlooked for losses C. C. still turned out 
a very fine team despite the contradictory evidence of the percentage column. 

There isn't a doubt in anyone's mind that the Tigers were the "hard-luck"' 
team of the conference. They played a superb game against 
Denver, only to have a victory slip from their grasp when a 
Pioneer end caught a long pass over the D. U. goal line, to 
defeat them 7-2. At Montana State a long pass again spelled 
defeat, by a margin of 6-3. And at the annual Homecoming 
the Tigers battled the favored Buffalos to a standstill for 
almost four quarters and then in the final minutes of play 
saw a blocked C. C. punt bring victory to a whipped Boulder 
team. Had Dame Fortune turned her fickle smile our way a 
little more often the Tigers would have ended right at the 
top of the list. 

RESUME OF THE SEASON— 

C. C. — D. U.: The Colorado College Tigers surprised 
the football world by the superb spirit and drive which they 
showed against the heavily favored Pioneer eleven. 




m 



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fcfifili 




411 



%, 




Receiving the opening kick-off the Tigers started 
the game with a bang by pulling one of the most 
spectacular plays seen on a Rocky Mountain grid- 
iron. Deacon received the ball and raced toward 
the east stands, the whole D. U. team following. 
Reaching the side line he suddenly turned and threw 
a long lateral, the width of the field, to Neil who 
galloped 40 yards to mid-field before being downed 
by the Denver safety. The Denver touchdown came 
in the third quarter when the Pioneers made a 
determined drive into Tiger territory. The Bengal 
line held for three downs on the two yard line but 
on the fourth down Denver threw a pass over the 
goal line into the waiting arms of Maio, huge Denver 
back. In the next few minutes the Tigers forced the 
Hill-Toppers back into their own territory and 
caught them behind their own goal for a safety and 
two points. In the Fourth quarter C. C. marched 
from their own 25 yard line to Denver's 20 but were 
unable to score and lost the ball on downs. The 
final score. 7-2, D. U. 

C. C. — Montana. The Tigers journeyed to Mon- 
tana for the first time in the history of their foot- 
ball competition and for the first time in history 
bowed their heads in defeat to a Bobcat eleven. 
Although C. C. drew first blood by scoring a 
placement from the 14 yard line in the first quarter 
the Bobcats overcame the temporary advantage by 
completing a long pass for their winning touchdown. 
The remainder of the game was played in mid-field 
with neither team showing anything but dogged 
determination, not yielding an inch to the other. The 
Bobcat defense seemed impregnable and the Tigers 



&*3fiJr 



O. TRAINOR 

ALDEND1FER 
CHENEY 

MARTIN 




^ ;'-.- *-^^fZk y±< 



found themselves unable to make a determined scor- 
ing drive. The Tigers seemed to have let down after 
their magnificent game with D. U. and this, coupled 
with the fact that the Bobcats were keyed to the 
breaking point for their homecoming game resulted 
in the unexpected upset. The game ended with the 
score 6-3 in favor of Montana. 

C. C. — Mines The Tigers and the Miners met 
for the forty-third time in gridiron competition. The 
Tigers maintained their record of wins over the 
Miners; an Oredigger team has not beaten a Tiger 
eleven since 1922. 

Colorado College showed little razzle-dazzle 
football but won by sheer hard driving, speed and 
power. The Bengal line was impregnable as usual, 
but the Miners scared the Bengals on several oc- 
casions with their passing attack. They gained 75 
yards from passes which was exactly as much as 
they made from scrimmage. As usual, the Miners 
produced a one man attack, with McDonald carry- 
ing the entire burden of the Blaster's offense. He 
carried the ball on all but two plays. 

The touchdown famine suffered by Colorado 
College was ended when Norman Trainor, a half- 
back, crossed the Mines goal stripe to contribute 12 
points to the 14-0 win for C. C. The Miners brought 
the ball within scoring distance twice but bad breaks 
and an alert Tiger team kept them from scoring. 

C. C. — C. U. A blocked punt in the final minutes 
of play spelled a heart-breaking defeat for the Tigers 
and for the thousands of alumni who were back for 
Homecoming. With two minutes to play. Linger of 





DILLINGHAM 

STERLING 

SAMWAYS 
COOL 



..- * : ■•■ ":::"' 






JztL 








iOO 





N. TRAINOR 



C. U. blocked a C. C. punt on the C. U. 35 yard 
line, scooped the ball and raced for the goal line. 

Except for the opening minutes of the game, the 
Tigers completely out-classed their heavier foes in 
one of the best football exhibitions ever staged on 
Washburn field. 

The Tigers consistently forced the Boulderites to 
play on the defensive and several times came within 
scoring distance, but did not have the offensive 
punch to put the ball across the goal line. 

A last minute rally by the Tigers was stopped 
by the final gun. The Bengals gave a marvelous 
exhibition of what can be accomplished by spirit 
and fight against heavy odds. Everyone, including 
the Buffalos, admitted that it was a moral victory for 
C. C. in spite of the 7-0 score. 

C. C. — Washburn. The Tigers and the Ichabods 
played to a 0-0 tie in the first of a home and home 
game arrangement with the Topeka Institution of 
higher learning. The game was played in a heavy 
snow storm which slowed it up considerably. Despite 
the weather, the contest provided many thrilling 
angles for the small band of spectators who braved 
the blizzard. 

The best play of the game was a pass by Wash- 
burn for about 25 yards, followed by a triple lateral 
which advanced the ball 60 yards to the C. C. four 
yard stripe. Here the Tigers held for downs and 
took the ball just as the half ended. 

The slippery field kept both teams from showing 
their best and the snow made the ball exceedingly 




V«p«r , jh m~ 



hard to handle. Advance reports gave the Ichabods 
credit for a very effective passing attack, however, 
the wet weather kept them from displaying anything 
other than the play mentioned above. The Tigers 
played their usual hard, clean game. 

C. C. — Western State. This game marked the 
eleventh meeting of the two institutions on the grid- 
iron. The Tigers maintained their unblemished 
record of never having been beaten by a Moun- 
taineer eleven. The game was featured by straight 
football; the Tigers failed to rely on the aerial attack 
in a single instance. In the first half they were never 
in a position to pass and in the second half it would 
have been foolish to have forsaken a running attack 
which was clicking so admirably. 

The Mountaineers outclassed the Tigers in the 
first half, but the Bengals came back in the second 
and, led by Neil and Trainor, carried the pigskin to 
Gunnison's goal line where Neil carried it across 
for the lone touchdown which spelled the 7-0 victory 
for Colorado College. 

The Tiger line was superior to that of the Moun- 
taineers and repeatedly outcharged and out-tackled 
the Westerners, who possessed a material weight 
advantage. 

C. C. — Aggies. The heavy Farmer team handed 
C. C. the worst defeat of the season. The final score 
was 19-12. In the first half the Aggie eleven seemed 
unconquerable. For the first time in two years the 
Tiger line faltered. It was their proud boast that the 
opposing teams scored over the line but never 
through. The Farmers smashed this record by scor- 






T^ry^ 




w 



to i 



ESPINOSA 

MOWRY 

BURKE 





WORL 

STILLMAN 

inn, i.; 



ing twice through the previously invincible Tiger 
forward wall. 

In the second half the Tiger line regained their 
spirit and confidence and played their usual sterling 
game. In the third period Norm Trainor went over 
for the first Bengal score on a beautiful cut-back. 
With three minutes to play Trainor faded back and 
sent a bullet pass across the goal into the waiting 
arms of Captain Haines, on a tackle eligible play for 
the second touchdown. 

During the remainder of the game the Tigers 
seriously threatened and would probably have made 
another touchdown had the game been two minutes 
longer. 

C. C. — B. Y. U. The Tigers ended their season 
in a burst of glory by defeating the favored B. Y. U. 
team 6-0. This made two victories in a row over 
the Cougars. 

The game was a great defensive battle and not 
until the Tigers used their famous "Marathon Pass." 
did they pierce the B. Y. U. defense. The play is 
very similar to the one which worked so effectively 
against D. U. in the season's opener. Deacon took 
the ball as if on a long left end run. As he reached 
the east side lines he suddenly whipped around and 
threw a 50 yard lateral to Mowry, who evaded a 
B. Y. U. would-be tackier and behind perfect inter- 
ference galloped for the winning touchdown. This 
great victory was a fitting climax for a season 
featured by its many moral victories. There should 
be little doubt left in anyone's mind that Colorado 
College had one of the best and also one of the 
unluckiest teams it has had in a long, long time. 



A 



'- 



I *# 



&M 



FRESHMEN FOOTBALL 

Despite lack of numbers and weight these em- 
bryonic Tigers showed the characteristic fight of 
all "Tiger Men" and under the tutelage of Guy 
Martin showed almost miraculous progress. D. U., 
boasting its finest Freshmen squad in years, played 
host to the cubs in the first clash of the year. Play- 
ing before a foreign crowd our boys were too tense 
and nervous and before they got their bearings. 
D. U.'s mammoth Frosh had turned the game into 
a rout. The outstanding man on the field for C. C. 
was Barney Boysen. a charging center, who made 
half the tackles and qenerally distinguished himself. 
Stinging under their first defeat, the Tiger Yearlings 
entertained Regis on Armistice day and to the cheers 
of the crowd soundly spanked them and sent them 
home as Louis Whittaker ran wild. 

THE TEAM OF 1940 

No write-up of the football season would be 
complete without mentioning the forgotten heros 
of the 1936 squad. These men were sophomores, 
who were kept on the sidelines to give them one 
extra year of football eligibility. These men came 
out night after night and worked as hard or harder 
than anyone on the squad yet they knew that they 
would not get a chance to show what they could 
do under fire. There is no doubt that many of these 
men would have made the team had they been given 
the opportunity, for they more than proved their 
worth in practice. These men were: Gordon Bugg, 
Kenny King, Morris Worl, Vernon Hunt, Jerry 





lair 4#«%r 




DEACON 

GALLAGHER 
CITTEL 





Martin, Curtis Gates. Floyd Bucklin, Jack Cittel, 
Steve Lowell, Wayne Gallagher, Ed Espinosa and 
Jim Sterling. Remember these names for you will 
undoubtedly be reading about them next year. 

Jo Biggs, captain elect 

merited the confidence of his team mates to the extent 
that they elected him captain for next year. Homer, 
who hails from Grand Junction, is a junior and has 
just finished his second year of varsity football. He 
is regarded as one of the scrappiest guards in the 
conference; even Bully thought he was a "scrappa." 
Jo received recognition on several all-star elevens 
and his leadership next year should be as much of 
an asset as his stellar line work. He is a member 
of Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

Harold "Softy" Haines, captain 

wrote finis to his collegiate football career against 
B. Y. U. Haines has been a consistent thorn in the 
sides of the opposition for the past two years. 
"Softy" distinguished himself in everything he did. 
from blocking and tackling to catching passes on 
tackle eligible plays. His all-around ability was 
given recognition by being selected on several 
mythical all-conference elevens. Captain Haines 
was well liked by every man on the squad; his 
smashing line play will be sorely missed next year. 
He is a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. 



i 



\A 



I 




SWITZER 

LOWELL 

JOLLEY 

CRIBARI 







FINAL CONFERENCE STANDINGS 

Team G. W. L. Td. Pet. 

Utah State 7 6 1 1000 

Denver U 8 6 1 1 .857 

Utah U. 7 5 2 .714 

Colorado U. ....6 4 2 .667 

Greeley State 7 4 3 .571 

B. Y. U 8 4 4 .500 

Colorado College 7 3 4 .429 

Colorado State 8 3 4 1 .429 

Wyoming U 7 2 4 1 .333 

Montana^ State 5 1 4 .200 

Western State ....Jo 1 5 .167 

Colorado Mines 6 1 5 .000 

SCHEDULE 1936 

Oct. 2 Denver— 7; C. C— 2. 

Oct. 10 Montana— 6; C. C— 3. 

Oct. 24 C. C— 14; Mines— 0. 

Oct. 31 Colo. U.— 7; C. C— 0. 

Nov. 7 C. C— 0; Washburn— 0. 

Nov. 14 C. C.—7; Western— 0. 

Nov. 21 Aggies— 19; C. C— 12. 

Nov. 28 C. C— 6; B. Y. U.—0. 

SCHEDULE 1937 

Oct. 2 Western State at Colorado Springs 

Oct. 9 Wyoming U. at Colorado Springs 

Oct. 16 Denver U. at Denver 

Oct. 23 Mines at Golden 

Oct. 29 Washburn at Topeka (night) 

Nov. 7 New Mexico at Colorado Springs 

Nov. 13 Colorado U. at Boulder 

Nov. 20 Colorado State at Colorado Springs 

Nov. ? Whitman College at Colorado Springs 




* \n m 





'&$& i£& 




tiQBAitoM 



GATES 

KEETON 

KING 



FOOTBALL LETTERMEN 



Aldendifer, Joe 
Biggs, Jo, Captain Elect 
Cool, Withers 
Cribari, George 
Deacon, Paul 
Dillingham, Tom 
Haines, Harold, Captain 
Jolley, Herb 
Keaton, Buster 
Mowry, Pete 



Nagy, Joe 
Neil, Wayne 
Samways, Jack 
Sinton, Jim 
Stillman, Harold 
Switzer, Russell 
Scudder, Robert 
Trainor, Orville 
Trainor. Norman 




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LOCKHAR r WOOD 







HalketbaU 



No coach in the Rocky Mountain conference faced a tougher 
task of rebuilding his club than did Coach Juan Reid, youthful 
Tiger mentor. C. C.'s losses were very heavy, graduation took 
both forwards, Harold Berg and "Pots" Berglund; the center, 
Alton Christenson and a steady guard, Al Costello. Jim Riley, 
all-division guard became ineligible and was lost to the team. 

This general exodus left only three letter men on the squad. 
Cook, Lockhart, guards, and Ken Hall, forward. When the squad 
was cut, seven of the twelve men picked were sophomores. This 
large number of sophs make a bright picture for the future but 
they were too inexperienced this year to do justice to Coach 
Reid's excellent system. 



-*« 



CAPTAIN CORY COOK 

Cory Cook, rated as one of the best all-around players in the 
Rocky Mountain conference, began his collegiate career at C. C. 
in 1932. He dropped out of school and returned in 1934. Due to 
great ball handling and clever passing Cory has been one of the 
mainstays of the Bengal team during his three years of varsity 
competition. Opponents have rated Cook as one of the hardest 
men in the conference to fake out of position. 

Cook was elected captain of the 1936-37 team after Jim Riley, 
who was elected last year, was declared ineligible for varsity 
competition. Cory was not interested in sports in high school until 
his senior year when he made first team in three major sports. His 
only collegiate sport has been basketball. 



ft 






ALDEND1FER 



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Durwood Lockhart, Captain-elect. Durk is a member of the junior class 
and is playing his third year on the Tiger squad. He is a consistently reliable 
player and has held down a guard post for the past two years. His team mates 
have recognized his ability by electing him to the captaincy for next year. He 
is a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

Bill Wolfe. Besides being a steady guard on the basketball team. Bill is a 
star player on the Tiger baseball nine. He is extremely fast with his hands and 
is rated the most improved man on the squad. He is a member of Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity and an officer of the junior class. We expect great things of 
Bill next year. 

Jack Haines. The Tiger high scoring forward, hails from North Denver 
high, where he was picked on the mythical all-state team. He was a member 
of last year's famous frosh team and has more than lived up to his excellent 
reputation this year. He is a sophomore and member of Sigma Chi fraternity. 

Frank Wood, the other starting forward, has won the acclaim of everyone 
for his great offensive floor game. He also hails from North Denver, where he 
starred with Haines and Bugg. Frank was a consistent player and could always 
be relied upon to turn in a good score. 

Gordon Bugg, the third of the champions from North Denver was probably 
the most aggressive man on the squad. There was always plenty of action 
when Gogo was in the game, he was following and fighting for the ball every 
minute. He has two more years of competition and there is no doubt that he 
will be a starter next year. 



Kenny Hall. Hall has played his last game for Colorado College, having 
played three years of varsity ball. Kenny is renowned for his spirit and fight. 
Besides being a dependable athlete, he made letters in both basket and base- 
ball. Kenny has made one of our best student presidents, and has established 
an enviable record as a student. 

Joe Aldendifer. "Busty," an all-around athlete, not only plays a good game 
of basketball but also stars in football and track. He is the only football letter- 
man to win his basketball letter and is also the onlv man with the chance to 
earn three major letters this year. Joe is also a first class swimmer and an 
excellent skiier. 

Eddie O'Neil. Eddie is a member of the sophomore class and played his 
first year of varsity basketball. Although one of the shortest centers in the 
conference, he frequently out-jumps his taller opponents. He is the smoothest 
player on the team and plays a consistently good floor game. Eddie returned 
to school this year after a two year layoff. Sophomore, home town Colorado 
Springs. 

Carroll Bullock. Carroll might well be nicknamed "Speed," for that would 
be most characteristic of him on the basketball court. He has done many fine 
jobs in relief roles and has won the admiration of all for his excellent spirit. 
More than once he has brought the stands to their feet with his thrilling shots 
in the closing minutes of a close game. Home town, Colorado Springs. 

Bob Livingston, tallest man on the squad, was greatly handicapped this 
year by a heavy schedule of courses demanding long laboratory periods and 
was therefore not able to devote the necessary time and energy to basketball. 
Bob gained much valuable experience which, coupled with his height, should 
make him very valuable next year. He is a member of the junior class and a 
resident of Colorado Springs. 



LIVINGSTON 



BAk'Nh.V M.,n.,c 




FRESHMEN BASKETBALL 

December brought not only Christmas but also the first call for basketball 
by Coach Dee Glidden. A talented array of performers responded and now 
C. C. could get its first criterion of what to expect from these hoopsters. 
Incidentally C. C. expects much in future years from these veterans, so called 
because as yet they are undefeated and have accounted for the downfall of 
such formidable foes as: D. U. Frosh. Regis Frosh, Canon City High School, 
Blair's Business College, and the local Y. M. C. A. 

The '40 edition of waxed court artists are rangy, fast, good shots, and have 
the faculty of playing hardest when the competition is toughest. This is a 
combination that bodes ill for future C. C. opponents. The squad is composed 
of Price, Macrum, Reid, Fleischli, Garkie. Ivory, Hoadley, Autrey, Osborn 
and Boyes. 



IIOADLEY. VKKINNIE AUTREY. IVORY. FOWLHR MACRUM. CARRIE. BOYES. REID. GLIDDEN 





HalebaU 




REID. SUTAK. ROBERTS. PRESKAR. MOWRY. HALL, HALL. WOLFE. ANDF 
MARTIN. OWENS. COSTELLO. NAGY. CHENEY. SWARTZ. DAMGAARD 



tiaieUU 1936 



C. C. — D. U. The Tigers won their season opener against Denver by a 
score of 10 to 7, but dropped the second of the double header 9 to 3. Bill 
Wolfe, pitching his first varsity game, played an outstanding game. Sutak was 
offensive star, getting three hits out of five trips. Captain Costello, Leonard 
and Owens played fine games. 

C. C. — Aggies. The Tigers again split the series, giving Aggies the first 
game 10 to 6 and taking the second 5 to 3. Cheney had good support in the 
second game, which enabled him to come through with his first victory. 

C. C. — Mines. For the first time in the season the Tigers won both games 
of the series. The Tigers were "on" the first game and ran up the largest score 
of the year in defeating the Miners 23 to 7. The second game was much closer 
with the Bengals winning by a score of 6-5. Costello, Hall, Nagy and Sutak 
all connected for home runs during the series. The Tigers, although out hit by 
the Miners, came out ahead due to the fine support of every member of the 
team. 

C. C. — C. U. In the last series of the Tigers' eight game schedule C. C. 
failed, for the first time, to win at least one game of a series. Superior hitting 
and better support of their pitchers were two of the reasons for Boulder's wins 
of 8-6 and 6-0. 



Juan Reid, former Colorado College athlete and head baseball coach took 
a squad of 13 men, the smallest squad in the conference, and made a dangerous 
team out of them, a team that played all eight of its games away from home 
and finished with a .500 average. The Tigers were the only team in the 
conference to beat Colorado Aggies until the pennant winning C. U. Buffaloes 
did in the final championship series. 

STEWART FIELD 

The new auxiliary field just north of Washburn was obtained by C. C. 
from the Colorado Springs park board as a direct result of generous cooper- 
ation on the part of many business men of the region. Among those who 
contributed to the development of the field are Ed Honnen, Doug Jardine, 
George H. Krause, William Thorne, and City officials of Colorado Springs. 
As a result of the unselfish work of many of these unsung boosters of Colorado 
College we now have a baseball diamond, and a practice football field as well 
as an area where intramural sports programs may be held. The C. C. baseball 
team has been greatly handicapped in the past because of lack of diamond 
facilities. Last year all home games had to be cancelled because no suitable 
ball park could be found. A renewed interest is being taken in baseball this 
year thanks to Stewart Field. C. C. fans will be able to witness home games 
and the Tiger nine can again settle into normal schedule after two years of 
traveling. The new field will be initiated this spring with four home conference 
games. 

The Tiger schedule is as follows: April 10, Denver University at Denver 
(doubleheader); April 16-17, Colorado Aggies at Colorado Springs; April 24, 
Colorado Mines at Colorado Springs (doubleheader); April 30-May 1, Colo- 
rado University at Boulder. 

ALL-CONFERENCE MEN 

First Team: Honorable Mention: 

Al Costello — Third Base Alf Owens — First Base 

John Sutak — Center Field Dick Hall — Second Base 

Second Team: Heni T Preskar— Right Field 
Joe Nagy — Catch 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN CONFERENCE STANDINGS 



Team 

Colorado University 

Colorado State 

Colorado College .... 
Denver University .. 

Greeley State 

Colorado Mines 



Pet. 

.857 
.571 
.500 
.500 
.250 
.000 



Batting Averages 



Name Pos. 

Costello 3B 

Sutak CF 

Owens IB 

Nagy C 

R. Hall 2B 

Preskar LF 

K. Hall RF 

Leonard SS 

Wolfe P 

Cheney P 

Roberts _P 



H 2B 3B HR 



Swartz 



RF 



1 



M 



owry 



1 



Pet. 

.265 
.273 
.333 
.250 
.353 
.292 
.250 
.154 
.211 
.286 
.000 
.111 
.330 



Fielding Average 



O 

15 

24 
S4 
SI 
23 
11 
7 
15 
1 

2 
1 

2 




Pet. 

.882 
.960 
.950 
.984 
.927 
.917 
.875 
.923 
.909 
.909 
1.000 
.500 
.000 



10 



.260 



22 .929 






% 



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7r«/ 1936 



The track and field outlook for 1936 was probably the darkest in history, 
due partly to graduation losses and partly to the application of the freshmen 
rule which bars first year men from varsity competition. 

The track squad was deficient numerically but as far as the caliber of the 
individuals were concerned, the Tiger tracksters were as efficient as ever. The 
most optimistic roll call taken by Track Coach Jo Irish revealed about 18 
candidates for the team. This was the first time in ten years that there has 
been less than 25 out for track. 

Eight lettermen comprised the nucleus of the 1936 squad. They were 
Captain Andy (Chink) Mihalick, weights; Ray Hess, javelin; Neil and Bruce, 
middle distance; Espinosa, sprints and broad jump; Mace, two miler; and 
Haines, weights. The rest of the squad were composed of holdovers who failed 
to qualify for letters in 1935. They were Christenson, Packard, Roberts, 
Switzer, Mowry, Frenzel, Phelps, Todd and Johnson. 

Jo Irish's track team produced several outstanding individual performers 
with Wayne Neil winning the eastern division 440 championship and finishing 
second in that event in the conference meet; Harold Haines winning second in 
the hammer in both division and conference meets; Andy Mihalick, Ray Hess 
and Ed Espinosa performing consistently well, especially in the dual meets. 
Mihalick, Hess and Espinosa shattered all time C. C. records during the season. 



/■" 




The outstanding event of the season was the showing made by the Tiger 
ten man track team against a horde of D. U. tracksters. Irish's seven-pointing 
entrants amassed the surprising total of 67 points to 73 for D. U. Colorado 
College needed a win in the mile relay to win the meet. The Tigers might have 
taken that event also, had not Haines and Mace been slowed up by injuries 
which had forced them to drop out of other events. Ray Hess, probably one of 
the outstanding, all-time, all around athletes ever to wear the Black and Gold, 
accounted for 21 points by winning firsts in the javelin toss, and the high jump; 
seconds in shot put, pole vault, and 220 yard hurdles; thirds in 120 high hurdles 
and the broad jump. 

RECORDS FALL 

Andy Mihalick, Tiger track captain, and No. 1 weight man, spun the discus 
136 feet in the Mines-Greeley meet, breaking his own record of 135 feet 
5 inches set the year before. 

In the dual meet with Colorado Mines, Ray Hess whipped the javelin 178 
feet 8 inches, to break his own of 169 feet set up in 1935. 

Another record holder on the squad not to be forgotten, is Ed Espinosa, 
who holds the all-time in the broad jump of 22 feet, 2 inches. 



COLORADO COLLEGE RELAYS 

Four out of five relay records and two special event marks fell by the 
wayside in the fourth annual C. C. relays for high school teams held at Wash- 
burn field. East Denver's Angels won the meet with a point total of 61, com- 
pared to 35 for South Denver Rebels, their nearest rivals. The new records 
set up were: 

Events Time 

440 Relay 



880 Relay 1:32.4 

1 Mile .......3:33.6 

Medley 3:46.3 



120 High Hurdles. 

Discus 

Novice 



Names Team 

44.7 sec R' n g. Thompson. Brown, 

Hoover East Denver 

Ring. Thompson, Brown, 

Hoover East Denver 

.....Manning, Simon, Rhodus. 

Kroll East Denver 

Shepard, De Saverio, 

Schoyer. Zourdes North Denver 

Cope South Denver 

128.9 feet Jones East Denver 

1.24 sec... Titley East Denver 



15.5 



COLORADO COLLEGE ALL-TIME RECORDS 



Event 

100 yard dash 



» Name 

9.8 sec O'Neal 



Year 

.1926 



220 yard dash 21.8 

440 yard dash 49.1 

880 yard dash 1:56.6 

Mile 4:27.5 

Two Mile 10:07.0 

Mile Relay 3:24.5 

High Hurdles 15.8 

Low Hurdles.. 24.3 

Shot Put 42 ft. 4 

Discus 136 ft 

Javelin 177 ft. 4 

Hammer 163 ft. 3 

High Jump 6 ft. 2 

Broad Jump 22 ft. 2 



Pole Vault 12 ft. 



.Mai Graham ...1921 

Orville Schisler 1929 

Wilbur Larson .....1934 

Ed Parker 1930 

Wilbur Larson .... ....1933 

Handke, Bruce, Larson, Neil... 1934 

-C. Davis 1915 

John Sutak 1933 

.M. Davis 1915 

Andy Mihahck ...1936 

Ray Hess 1936 

.Earl Clark 1930 

M. Davis 1915 

Ed Espinosa 1935 

Keith Sarcander 1928 



FRESHMEN TRACK 

Spring will bring grass, love, and track to C. C. Though there is little 
regular competition for Freshmen tracksters it is a chance to get some valuable 
training under Coach Jo E. Irish that will stand them in good stead when they 
become eligible. As every spring rolls around, an intramural track meet is 
held that uncovers any new or latent material. This spring will be no different 
and the freshmen will be the unknown quantity making the event memorable. 




DILLINGHAM PENLAND 

DICKISON BERG LOESCH LORENZ 



m fcnni5 1936 



The varsity tennis team swung into action without the services of a good 
part of the 1935 championship team. The men lost by graduation were Jack 
Livingston, Don Hibbard, Jack Bohon, and Bob Lamasure. The three letter- 
men returning were Captain "Potts" Burglund, R. M. C. singles champion 
Murray Lorenz, and Dick Dickison. 

C. C. — Mines. The Tigers started the season with a bang by defeating the 
Colorado School of Mines in a dual meet in Monument Valley park. The 
Bengals came out on top by winning three singles and two doubles matches. 
The winning men were: Berglund, Dickison and Loesch in the singles and the 
doubles teams of Berglund and Loesch. and Lorenz and Armstrong. 

C. C. — C. U. In the second meet of the season the Tigers lost to Boulder 
in a much interrupted meet, due to frequent showers. Harrison Loesch was the 
only man to win his match. The doubles were postponed because of rain. 

C. C. — D. U. Denver scored a decisive victory in a dual meet on the 
Quackenbush courts in Monument Valley park, winning seven out of nine 
matches. C. C. won two singles matches, Berglund and Dickison taking their 
matches. The Pioneers swept the doubles matches. 

Eastern Division Meet. Colorado University was successful in their attempt 
to down the Tigers and won the meet by 21 points to 16 for C. C. 

Captain Harold Berglund, C. C. ace, successfully defended his singles 
championship by defeating Wigatow of C. U. 6-2, 6-0, 6-2. 




<?*% 1936 



The 1936 edition of the Colorado College golf team turned in a moderately 
successful season with Captain Art Doering, R. M. C. champion, as the out- 
standing man on the team. 

C. C. — D. U. The Hilltoppers were too much for the Tigers and won by a 
score of 12 to 6. Doering and Rustin were the Tigers winning their matches. 
Lamar, Mclntyre, Cary and Switzer lost to their opponents. 

C. C— C. U. In their match with Boulder C. C. lost 12^ to 5 x / 2 . Joe Rustin 
was high point man for the Tigers. Mclntyre and Rustin were the winning 
C. C. golfers. 

Conference Tournament. Art Doering, C. C. Captain and defending 
champion passed the field, in the conference tournament held at Cherry Hills, 
to win medal honors, while the C. U. five man team retained its title for another 
year. 

Individual scoring for C. C: Doering 76-75 — 151; Mclntyre 92-86 — 178; 
Lamar 93-87—180; Vary 94-110—204; and Rustin 96-97—193. 

In the conference finals Art Doering retained his Rocky Mountain confer- 
ence championship by scoring a 4 to 3 victory over Brown of Colorado 
University. 



Sfptlnq 36 jfpottl SJitttamutaL 



TRACK 

In the annual "spiked" interview it be- 
came evident that the Sigma Chis had 
won a notable victory chiefly through four 
first won by Aldendifer and Bugg. 



HORSE SHOES 

Spring, flowers and love rolled blithely 
around to find the "Fijis" nonchalantly 
throwing "ringers" to the dismay of the 
other three entrants — incidentally Phi 
Gams came off the victor. 



SOFT BALL 

Sigma Chi stepped up to the plate and 
knocked the hopes of the other five teams 
into the proverbial "waste basket." Rumor 
has it that they couldn't hit but how he 
could pitch. 



TENNIS, SPRING 36 

Termination of Spring tennis found the 
Phi Gams courting victory in both the 
single endeavor and in the dual struggle 
with Wolfe and Packard losing nary a 
match. 



GOLF 

The only "birdies" were in the trees 
and the "Eagles" had gone fishing, never- 
theless, without their help the golf meet 
progressed — result, Betas 23, Phi Gams 
16, Sigma Chis 8. 



7a// '36 



CROSS COUNTRY 

Pushing runners across the line in 2nd, 
3rd, 7th, and 8th positions enabled Sigma 
Chi to successfully refute the individual 
dominance of Mace. Phi Gam, by garner- 
ing 20 points. 



TOUCH FOOTBALL 

The Phi Delts leaped, twisted, and 
passed their way to victory in this annual 
tourney. A three way tie for second left 
the Betas. Kappa Sigs, and Phi Gams 
arguing as to their respective supremacy. 



FALL TENNIS 
Racquet wielders from Beta Theta Pi 
and Phi Delta Theta were unable to settle 
their controversy on the court — conse- 
quently each received 20 points and a half 
share in the crown. 



HAND BALL 

The handball crown was won by Phi 
Gamma Delta due mainly to the efforts of 
Wolfe, singles champ. Second place was 
won by Kappa Sigma. 



VOLLEY BALL 

Volleying the ball across a net seemed 
to appeal to every fraternity. Conse- 
quently a hard battle ensued, with Sigma 
Chi and Phi Gamma Delta tying for first. 
In the play off the Sigs soundly trounced 
the Phi Gams. 



7a// '36 



BASKET BALL 

Perhaps the most exciting sport of all 
was won by the Independents at the ex- 
pense of the Kappa Sigs. The most color- 
ful team to play was the Faculty, noted for 
their cagy play and for Bully's rushing 
overhead setup. 



BOXING 

Harvesting black eyes, bloody noses, 
and a few championships Phi Gamma 
Delta won the team championship with 19 
points, followed by Independents 10, and 
Kappa Sigma 9. 



WRESTLING 

The brawny Kappa Sigs grunted their 
way to a championship by squeezing 22 
points out of the meet. Phi Gams collected 
10andPhiDelts5. 



SOCCER 

The most grueling sport on the campus 
resulted in a tie between Kappa Sigma 
and Phi Delta Theta. The Phi Delts won 
in the classic skinned shin "bowl" game. 



SWIMMING 

Phi Delta Theta amassed 22 points 
to win the 1937 C. C. swimming meet. 
Beta Theta Pi placed second with 19 
points. The meet, drawing 40 participants, 
was the best aquatic event ever staged 
at C. C. 






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HOWARD ROBERTS WHITE MACE CLARK NEILL BILLINGS 

DUGGAN LAMME TRAINOR PEDERSON ADAMS BRODERICK 

WARNER REHM VAN WAGNON 



3ki0U 



Probably unique among the colleges of the country in that good skiing is 
available nine months of the year within an hour by motor from the campus, 
Colorado College has developed a vigorous winter sports group this year. 
Each Sunday Glen Cove has attracted numerous skiers. Rapid improvement 
has been shown in the many novices. 

Colorado College was represented at the collegiate championship meet at 
Berthoud pass and though the squad was small it returned with first place in 
two of the four events. Ted Billings, a freshman, won the jumping contest 
and Gordon Mace repeated his triumph of the previous year by winning the 
cross country race. Tish Rawles added to these victories by tying for first 
place in the women's race. 

Colorado College was host to the skiers of other institutions of the state at 
a tournament held at Glen Cove April 11. 1937. 



Betty Adams 
Willis Armstrong 
Ted Billings 
Jean Broderick 
Betty Clark 
Mary Ellen Duggan 
John Howard 
Hilliard Kalamava 



MEMBERS 

Arthur Kruggel 
Stephen Lamme 
Gordon Mace 
Hildegarde Neill 
Letitia Rawles 
Margery Roberts 
Harold Stillman 
Orville Trainor 



May van Wagnen 
Louise Warner 
Doris White 
John Worth 
Isabel Pederson 
Robert Rehm 
Robert C. Boyle 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Dr. Frank Chambers Dr. T. H. Rawles 

Dr. C. W. Penland 




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The "C" Club is made up of all the men students who have received letters 
for athletic participation. Initiation for new members is held in the spring. 



MEMBERS 



Joe Biggs 
Cory Cook 
Tom Dillingham 
Kenneth Hall 
Herbert Jolley 
Bibb Lamar 
Durward Lockhart 
Beryl Mowry 
Edward Pelz 
Jack Samways 
James Sinton 
Harold Stillman 
Russell Switzer 
Norman Trainor 
Orville Trainor 
Bill Wolfe 
Cecil Cheney 



Paul Deacon 
Alf Owens 
Harold Haines 
Joe Nagy 
Murray Lorenz 
Richard Dickison 
Edward Espinosa 
Carl Swartz 
Fred Miles 
James Mclntyre 
Gordon Mace 
Joe Aldendifer 
Withers Cool 
George Cribari 
Buster Keaton 
Bob Scudder 



iv. -e.g. 



The Women's Athletic Association is an organization to further the interest 
of the women students in athletics. W. A. A. sponsors contests in which 
members of the four sororities and the unaffiliated women take part. Prizes are 
awarded at the end of the year to the group getting the highest number of 
points. 

MEMBERS 



Phyllis Abdullah 
Carolyn Allen 
Betty Adams 
Betty Andrae 
Betty Bartlett 
Helen Brobeck 
Barbara Burns 
Jane Button 
Betty Clark 
Johnnie Dailey 
Jerry Dailey 
Mary deLongchamp 
Fifi Dulan 
Frances Ennis 
Marjorie Fender 
Jean Fontius 
Margaret Gammon 
Marion Garritson 
Jane Ann Gassman 
Helen George 
Virginia Harlan 
Eleanor Harter 
Barbara Healey 
Barbara Hurley 
Maxine Jarvis 
Marjorie Jones 
Betty Jean Jones 
Betty Ann Kaemerling 
Clesta Kramlich 
Georgia Lamon 
Irma Marker 
Mary Alice McConnell 
Kay McLean 
Dorothy McKeown 
Mary Musser 
Betty Middlekauff 
Hildegarde Neill 
Marie Ostendorf 
Isabel Pederson 



Evelyn Peterson 
Eleanor Pick 
Evelyn Pick 
Edith Pratt 
Katherine Renfro 
Marjorie Roberts 
Jerry Saviers 
Beatrice Snider 
Monona Shellenberger 
Mary Ann Stone 
Myla Jean Thomas 
Bettv Ruth Treece 
Mary Lou Waldron 
Mary Van Wagnen 
Mary Van Lopik 
Doris White 
Barbara White 
Margaret Wilkins 
Mildred Lee Wilson 
Adeline Zanotti 
Katherine Brown 
Ruth Boatright 
Frances Conway 
Mary Harris 
Louise Grabow 
Jane Green 
Doris Rhoads 
Jane Underhill 
Dorothy Johnson 
Mary Lou Johnson 
Lucile Nelson 
Kay Smith 
Mary Ellen Duggan 
Betty Blair 
Elise Hayes 
Lydia Douthirt 
Barbara Ann Lewis 
Lois Livinoston 
Bettv McKee 



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\IAAR UDICK SHAKESPEARE CORNING 

WENS RUST1N KIRBY RIDDOCH 

3LPH MacDONALD V1LLARS FENNELL 

Untet-T^tatetnltu Council 

The Inter-Fraternity Council is made up of twelve members, two from each 
fraternity. Its function is in solving inter-fraternity problems, such as making 
dates for rush weeks, hell weeks, and formulating rules for date cards. Another 
of its problems is in designating which group should ring Cutler bell after a 
victory. Eligibility for such things as offices is passed on by this representative 
group. Each year a dance is sponsored by the council. 



The members are: 




Alfred Owens 


Charles MacDonald 


Earl Udick 


George Villars 


Joe Rustin 


James Fennell 


Hobart Corning 


Ben Kirby 


Ronnie Rolph 


Charles Shakespeare 


Keith Riddoch 


Bibb Lamar 



Faculty Representative. Arthur Sharp 



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OWENS HOLMAN HANEY 

MILLWARD BULLOCK FLEISCHLI 

LANEBACK JENSEN HARMSTON 




Pkl Vdta Tketa 

Founded at Miami University, 1848 
Flower — White Carnation Colors — Azure and Argent 



Class of '37 

Kenneth Hall 
Carl Swartz 
Earl Udick 

Class of '38 
James Colling 
Robert Keeton 
Alfred Owens 
Dale Owens 
Robert Nelson 
Fred Weidmann 

Class of '39 

Robert Boyle 
Wayne Gallagher 
James Haney 
Franklin Laneback 
James Millward 
Max Moberly 
Carl Wilm 



Class of '40 

Bernard Boysen 
William Bruce 
William Fleischli 
Russell Gates 
Gordon Harmston 
Scott Holman 
John Howard 
Thomas Ivory 
Clyde Jay 
Hilliard Kalamaya 
Mark Leahy 
George Price 
Charles Van Wert 
Robert Bruce 



Faculty Member 

William Travis Van de Gi 





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BEACH CLELAND HILLVARD SMITH McINTYRE 

TELLER BILLINGS MACE NAISMITH McWILLIAMS 

McVEY BARNES RUST1N HENDERSON NEWSOM 

SCUDDER LAMME BECK WOODS CR1BARI McCAULEY MURRAY 

GARKIE STILLMAN RYDER SELLNER AUTREY COSTELLO ARMSTRONG 

'.ATh.s SIMPSON CORNING SHERIDAN KRUGGEL LOWELL BOYES 

THOMPSON WOLFE ROBERTS BUCHANAN FROST SHIVERS WERNER 



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Founded at Washington and Jefferson, 1848 
Flower — Purple Clematis Color — Royal Purph 



Class of '37 

Willis Armstrong 
Houston Buchanan 
Hobart Corning, Jr. 
Jim Mclntyre 
Joe Rustin 
Marcus Shivers 
Laird Smith 

Class of '39 

Raymond Barnes 
Paul Garkie 
Victor McVey 
Bob Beach 
Tom Cleland 
Jeff Frost 
George Cribari 
Curtis Gates 
Bill Henderson 
Bill Hillyard 
Dalton Jenkins 
Ted Little 
Steve Lowell 
Ned McWilliams 
Jim Naismith 
Bob Scudder 



Class of '38 
Art Kruggel 
Gordon Mace, Jr. 
Jack Murray 
Bill Sheridan 
Fred Simpson 
Harold Stillman 
Bill Wolfe 

Class of '40 
Don Autrey 
Theodore Billings 
William Boyes 
Caswell Beck 
William Halley 
Owen Kenney 
Steve Lamme 
Junior Newsom 
Wilmot Nichols 
Ben Ryder 
Edward Roberts 
Jack Sellner 
Bob Thompson 
George Teller 
Ernest Werner 
Kenneth Woods 
Archie Costello 



Members on Faculty 

Guy H. Albright 
Ralph J. Gilmore 
Jack F. Lawson 
Arthur G. Sharp, Jr. 
Melvin S. Weimer 

Dr. Leo W. Bortree, 
Medical Adviser 





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Class of '37 




Class of '38 


Dale Ashbaugh 




Frank Argust 


George Fisher 




Joe Biggs 


Murray Lorenz 




John Ferguson 


Charles Shakespeare 




Gordon Gallup 


Orville Trainor 




Bibb Lamar 


Bill Tudor 




Durward Lockhart 


Walter Weldon 




Charles Love 


Jay Whaley 




Jack Samways 
James Walts 
Herb Jolley 
Harold Tanner 
Sam Mercer 


Class of '39 




Class of '40 


Jack Cittel 




Harmon Jones 


Dale Enyart 




Gregory Loesch 


Vernon Hunt 




Robert Aschermann 


Robert Kelt 




Oliver Ballinger 


Kenneth King 




Jim Capes 


Fran Rousseau 




James Grey 


Jim Sterling 




Warren Marriage 


David Wilkins 




Irvin Sherwood 


Malcolm Loesch 




Steve Burg 
Charles Welch 



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button 

DILTS 
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WALDEN 

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BOWMAN 

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RIDDOCH 

D1TSON 

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BOYKO 

ROBBINS 

RIDDOCH 

MAK1NS 

ROE 

DICKISON 

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Z1EGLER 

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DICKISON 

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3eta Theta Pi 

Founded at Miami University, 1839 



Flower — Rose 

Class of '37 

Robert Slate 
Keith Riddoch 
Tom Dillingham 
Alfred Cronk 
Ronald Rolph 
Tilton Barron 

Class of '39 

Bud Dolan 
Ralph Goloven 
James Masterson 
Ed O'Neil 
William Sheehan 
Cecil Wright 
Howard Dilts 
Harold Bowman 
Jack Childs 

Graduate Students 

Robert Kelly 

Faculty 

Dean Thomas H. Rawles 

Carroll B. Malone 

Dr. Bradford J. Murphey 



Colors — Pink and Blue 

Class of '38 
John Bovko 
Cortland Cool 
Withers Cool 
Richard Dickison 
Wilkin Johnstone 
Ernest Schwertscharf 
Robert Summers 

Class of '40 

Harold Anderson 
John Button 
Ray Dickison 
Chris Ditson 
Mac Heard 
Kelly Heath 
Richard Hoadley 
Arnold Kimmell 
Ray King 
Thomas Malone 
Leland Riddoch 
Richard Robbins 
Charles Roe 
Jack Walden 
Richard Ziegler 
John Hill 
Louis Schoen 
Donald Makins 
Byron Maxwell 
Cecil McGlothen 
Tom Brickell 




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STATEN NORTON RODGERS HOWARD 

CHAPMAN LIND MARTIN TREECE 

LOSER HUGHES QUINN GLEW 

RAYFORD CHAPMAN CUNNINGHAM STEELE 

ARMSTRONG McCLURE PHELPS FENNELL 

SMITH HETHERLY 



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Founded at Boston University, 1909 
Flower — Violet Colors — Purple, Green, and Gold 



Class of '37 

Robert Glew 
Ben Kirby 
Ronald Chapman 

Class of '39 

Ted Murray 
Lee Treece 
Fred Staten 
Glen Rogers 
Charles Boyce 
James Fennell 
Everett Cunningham 
Donald Norton 
Joseph Wilson 
Gerald Martin 
Jerry Howard 



Class of '38 

James Hetherly 
Robert Lind 
Frank Phelps 

Class of '40 

Robert Loser 
Byron McClure 
Robert Chapman 
Patrick Quinn 
Richard Hughes 
James Smith 
Lester Seelig 
Ray Rayford 
Howard Armstrong 

Special 

Arnold Steele 








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FOWLER MACRUM HOVER 

MacDONALD PELZ GRAHAM 

SHAW CAMPBELL VANDER-WEVDEN 

DAMGAARD CLARK DAY 

SNIDER VILLARS VAN-SAUN 

CHELEY PALMER DICKEY 




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Founded at Miami University, 1855 
Flower — White Rose Colors — Blue and Old Gold 



Class of '37 


Class of '38 


Richard Alderson 


Nat Cary 


John Dickey 
Jimmy Roberts 


Cory Cook 
Loring Lennox 
Robert Livingston 


George Villars 


Ed Pelz 




Russell Switzer 


Class of '39 


Class of '40 


Joe Aldendifer 


Jim Campbell 


Gordon Bugg 


John Fowler 


Ed Cary 


Don Graham 


Jack Cheley 
Russell Clark 


Bill Hover 
David Kanaly 


John Damgaard 


Russell Kruse 


Robert Dukes 


Eugene Louthan 


Don Howard 


Dick Macrum 


Harold Mulnix 


Joe Massie 


Holcombe Palmer 


Dwight Reid 


John Pleasant 


Bill Shaw 


Sherman Sutliff 


Gordon Snider 


Morris Worl 


Allen Vander Weyden 


Robert Day 


Dick Van Saun 


Jack Haines 


Louis Whittecar 




Berlyn Brenner 


Special 


Leo Fisher 


Charles MacDonald 


Faculty 


Wayne Neil 


Juan Reid 










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Panhellenic Council is the governing body for the sororities. It is made up 
of one senior and one junior member of each sorority. Such things as rules for 
rushing, regulation of the amount to be spent on rushing, the grade required 
for initiation into sororities are under the jurisdiction of this body. 

MEMBERS 

Seniors 

Susan Braerton, President Delta Gamma 

Maidie Rothgerber, Vice-President Kappa Alpha Theta 

Marguerite Ridge, Secretary Gamma Phi Beta 

Mary Gilmore, Treasurer Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Juniors 

Elisabeth Askling Delta Gamma 

Betty Trueblood Kappa Alpha Theta 

Agnes Sands Gamma Phi Beta 

Peggy Simpson Kappa Kappa Gamma 



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Cfamma J^ltl Seta 

Founded at Syracuse University, 1874 
Flower — Pink Carnation Colors — Brown and Mode 



Class of '37 

Alice Cary 
Marjorie Fender 
Mary Figge 
Elynor Sue Galloway 
Ruth Martin 
Marguerite Ridge 
Doris Shock 
Berta Trotter 

Class of '39 

Marjorie Brooks 
June Rose Middlesworth 
Evelyn Peterson 
Dorothy May Thompson 
Bernice Vessey 
Adeline Zanotti 

Graduate 

Billie Bennett 



Class of '38 

Phyllis Abdullah 
Pauline Anderson 
Doris Barton 
Mary Ella Gilmore 
Agnes Sands 



Class of '40 

Elizabeth Adams 
Elizabetji Andreae 
Elizabeth Barnes 
Helen Bradt 
Harriette Boutin 
Francis Ennis 
Ruth Gilmore 
Mary Louise Johnson 
Dorothy Lapham 
Barbara Lee 
Margaret Ellen Martin 
Grace Edith Mason 
Mary Alice McConnell 
Elizabeth Patterson 
Mary Anne Stone 
Doris White 
Wanetta White 
Mildred Lee Wilson 






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LAWSON 

GEORGE 

EUBANK 

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HARRIS 

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R1TTER 

ROBERTS 

COLLISON 



BARK ALOW YAN(>( IIOWSKI 



SEER1E 
WHITE 
RENFRO 
HOSKINS 
LAMON 

RHOADS NOLLENBERGER McCORMICK 

YEAGER FRANK VAN WAGNEN HAAFF 



COMBS 
COLLISON 
NEILL 
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UNDERHILL 

PHILLIPS 

WALTON 

PROCTOR 

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McFARLAND 
BRODERICK 
SWAN 

HUTCHINSON 
SIMPSON 
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Kappa Kappa Qamma 

Founded at Monmouth College. 1870 
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Class of '37 

Virginia Collisson 
Luzilla Eubank 
Mary Gilmore 
Martha Lou Phillips 

Class of 39 

Jean Broderick 
Catherine Brown 
Jeane Collisson 
Marjorie Combs 
Louise Grabow 
Mary Harris 
Jule Hutchinson 
Georgia Lamon 
Rita McCormick 
Elizabeth Middlekauff 
Hildegarde Neill 
Kathryn Renfro 
Doris Rhoads 
Beth Ritter 
Virginia Seerie 
Jane Underhill 
Mary Van Lopik 
Laura Work 
Helen Zick 
Helen George 



Class of '38 

Mary Barkalow 
Aleanor Haaff 
Dorothy May Lawson 
Marguerite McFarland 
Claire Proctor 
Leticia Rawles 
Peggy Simpson 
Peggy Swan 
Isabel Yanochowski 

Class of '40 

Jean Barkalow 
Helen Brobeck 
Harriet Ann Frank 
Carolyn Henderson 
Helen Hoskins 
Elizabeth Nollenberger 
Margery Roberts 
May Van Wagenen 
Betty Lou Walton 
Barbara White 
Margaret Wilkins 
Elizabeth Yeager 







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Founded at Oxford, Mississippi. 1872 
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Class of '37 

Susan Braerton 
Blanche Nolan 
Martha Frances Howell 



Class of '39 
Elizabeth Bartlett 
Ruth Bischof 
Marian Buckley 
Elizabeth Copeland 
Lydia Douthirt 
Marian Garritson 
Jane Green 
Marjorie Harrington 
Elise Hayes 
Patricia Marshall 
Elizabeth Mellenthin 
Rossa Blair Mosher 
Lucille Nelson 
Virginia Waters 



Class of '38 

Elisabeth Askling 
June Mary Chapman 
Ruth Doughty 
Esther Edwards 
Jean Fontius 
Margaret Gammon 
Mary Musser 
Beatrice Snider 
Virginia Thornton 
Louise Warner 
Helen Margaret Woods 
Monona Shellenberger 
Genevieve Walberg 

Class of '40 

Mary Helen Cameron 
Geraldine Daily 
Joanne Daily 
Mary de Longchamps 
Barbara Healey 
Barbara Hurley 
Lois Livingston 
Harriet Sutliff 
Myla Jeanne Thomas 
Dorothy Johnson 
Miriam Thornton 







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PENDERGAST 

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WILLIAMS 

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Founded at De Pauw University, 1870 
Flower — Pansy Colors — Black and Gold 




Class of '37 

Lucille Hampton 
Ruth Ann Johnson 
Miriam Rothgerber 

Class of '39 

Jeanne Biggs 
Elizabeth Clark 
Doris Adele Jones 
Irma Marker 
Elizabeth McKee 
Felicia Mongone 
Charlotte Pendergrast 

Graduate 

Margaret Utterback 



Class of '38 
Adele Hartner 
Jeanne Hauser 
Maxine Jarvis 
Betty Trueblood 

Class of '40 

Elizabeth Boerstler 
Joan Chapman 
Jacqueline Dulin 
Jane Ann Gassman 
Virginia Harlan 
Eleanor Harter 
Dorothy Holmes 
Marjorie Jones 
Mary Jane Kleinsorge 
Clesta Kramlich 
Martha Lemon 
Kathryn MacLean 
Mary Ann McBride 
Edith Pratt 
Geraldine Saviers 
Kay Smith 
Betty Ruth Treece 
Jean Weddington 
Susan Williams 




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SHAKESPEARE UDICK SWARTZ DILLINGHAM 

HALL CRONK CORNING 

Red Jlantetn &lul> 

Membership in the Red Lantern Club is deemed the highest honor which 
can be attained by a senior man. Its purpose is to perpetuate the traditions of 
Colorado College. Initiates to this organization may be seen in the spring 
carrying red lanterns; by this sign ye shall know them. 





MEMBERS 




James Riley 




Murray Lorenz 


Wayne Neil 




Charles Shakespeare 


Harold Haines 




A. J. Cronk 


Kenneth Hall 




Tom Dillingham 


Carl Swartz 




Hobart Corning 


Earl Udick 




Joe Rustin 


Robert Glew 







ftlti Uteta Kappa 



Phi Beta Kappa is the national honorary organization made up of those 
members of the senior class having the highest scholastic average. Each year 
the highest boy and girl in the junior class are elected as Junior members. 

MEMBERS 

Class of 1937: Blanche Nolan 

Jean Crawford Isabel Seeley 

Herbert Newhall Doris Shock 

Conrad Brown Mary Volgin 

Mary Bledsoe „. , 1ft: . c 

Mary Gayle Dowson Class of 1938: 



Edward Pelz 



Margaret Kelley k L ** t 

3 7 Dorothy May L 



aw son 



Professor George L. Anderson, University of Kansas 

Miss Martha Belschner. Colorado College 

Miss Lorena Berger. Colorado College 

Professor Edith C. Bramhall. University of Indiana 

Dr. Frank Chambers, Harvard 

Professor David W. Crabb, Colorado College 

Professor Harold T. Davis, Colorado College 

Professor Amanda M. Ellis, Colorado College 

Dean Louise W. Fauteaux, Colorado College 

Professor Ralph J. Gilmore, Lehigh 

Dean Edward D. Hale, Williams 

Mrs. Dorothy P. Hulbert, Oberlin 

Professor Charles T. Latimer. Colorado College 

Professor Carroll B. Malone. Western Reserve 

Dean James G. McMurtry, Colorado College 

Professor Herbert E. Mierow, Colorado College 

Dean Thomas H. Rawles, University of Indiana 

Professor Charles H. Sisam, University of Michigan 

Mr. William T. Van de Graaff, University of Alabama 

Mr. Melvin Weimer, Colorado College 



&elta £f25ilon 



Delta Epsilon was founded at Colorado College in 1921. Each year 
senior majors in the sciences are invited to report on individual research for 
membership in the organization. Elections are held late in the year so it is 
impossible to get the 1937 list. Those elected in 1936 were: 



James Brady 
James Green 
Charles Winter 
Lowell Coulter 
Everett Hopper 
Frank Young 
Margaret Stewart 
Lois Mae Lear 
Barbara Balkam 



Ernestine Stroup 
Florence Anderson 
Dorothea Carlton 
Harold Packard 
Harriet Henke 
Ernest Lewis 
Paul Stevenson 
Betty Predovich 
Roberta Winter 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Dr. O. A. Barnes 
Miss Martha Belschner 
Dr. William A. Blakely 
Dr. A. W. Boissevain 
Dr. Paul E. Boucher 
Dr. Frank W. Douglas 
Dr. William F. Drae 
Dr. Ralph J. Gilmore 
Dr. William V. Lovitt 
Mr. H. E. Mathias 



Dr. Bradford J. Murphey 
Mr. Frank M. Okey 
Mr. Howard Olson 
Mr. Gordon Parker 
Dr. William C. Penland 
Mr. W. W. Postlethwaite 
Dr. William C. Service 
Dr. Charles H. Sisam 
Dr. Thomas H. Rawles 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Alfred Cowles. Ill W. W. Postlethwaite 






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MARTIN 



ike -Associated Student 5 ofi (2o Lot ado (ZoLLeqe 

The Administrative Council which is the governing body of the Students 
of Colorado College has attempted to encourage a cooperative spirit between 
the different organizations on the campus and to direct their widely varied 
interests toward a common goal. 

The prime achievement of this year's council is the redecorating and fur- 
nishing of the new Student Union Building, Lennox House. 

MEMBERS 

Kenneth Hall --------- President of A. S. C. C. 

A. J. Cronk ----- Senior Man, Vice-President of A. S. C. C. 

Joe Rustin ------------- Senior Man 

Maidie Rothgerber Senior Woman, Social Chairman 

Bibb Lamar - - President Junior Class 

Alf Owens - - - - Junior Man, Representative to Publications Board 
Claire Proctor ----- Junior Woman, Secretary of A. S. C. C. 

George Cribari -- President Sophomore Class 

Helen Zick ----------- Sophomore Woman 

George Teller President Freshman Class 

Ruth Martin President of Associated Women Students 

Laird Smith Editor of Tiger 

Thomas H. Rawles - Faculty Representative 



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BLEDSOE BOATR1GHT ROTHGERBER SEELEY GILMORE PROCTOR MARTIN 

LAWSON SHOCK BRAERTON GREEN RIDGE HAUSER McFARLAND 

SCHIDDEL DOUGHTY CLARK ADAMS MUSSER HUTCHINSON 

-fiMociated U/omen J>tudent5 

The Associated Women Students of Colorado College, which is composed 
of all the coeds in school, was created to help further interest in the activities 
of the college among the women and their organizations. The board, which 
includes Mrs. Louise Fauteaux, Dean of Women, as an ex-officio member, 
formulates the policies of the sponsor organization, and has charge of the 
vocational guidance for women. This last year Miss Osborn was brought 
to Colorado College to talk to the women students about charm. 

A. W. S. BOARD 
President ......... Ruth Martin 

Vice-President Marguerite McFarland 

Secretary ......... Jule Hutchinson 

Treasurer ......... Claire Proctor 

Delta Gamma -------- Sue Braerton 

Kappa Alpha Theta ...... Maidie Rothgerber 

Gamma Phi Beta ------- Marguerite Ridge 

Kappa Kappa Gamma ...... Mary Gilmore 

W. A. A. -------- - Mary Musser 

Q. A. - - - - - Mary Bledsoe 

A. S. C. C. - Ruth Martin 

Campus Club ------- Eleanor Trumbull 

Tiger Club --------- Ruth Doughty 

Senior Woman -------- Isabel Seeley 

Junior Woman -------- Louise Schiddel 

Sophomore Woman - Ruth Boatright 

Freshman Woman - - Betty Adams 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 
Social ---------- Jane Green 

Publicity -------- Dorothy May Lawson 

Sponsor ---------- Doris Shock 

Women's Interest ----- Marguerite McFarland 

Poster Jeanne Hauser 




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HARRIS 

J. BARKALOW 



QuadtanaU -@Mociation 

The Quadrangle Association which was organized to provide self-govern- 
ment among the residents of the women's dormitories, functions chiefly through 
the medium of the Quadrangle Association board. This board, which is made 
up of representatives of different classes and organizations, establishes and 
enforces rules governing the women in the halls and promotes social activities 
among them, thus establishing a friendly and cooperative spirit in the dormi- 
tories. 

Mary Bledsoe President 

Alice Cary Vice-President 

Mary Barkalow Recording Secretary 

Louise Warner _____ Corresponding Secretary 
Jane Green -___---___ Treasurer 
Mary Harris __-----_ Social Chairman 
Maidie Rothgerber _----- President of Bemis 
Adele Hartner ------- President of Ticknor 

Jean Barkalow President of McGregor 

Dean Fauteaux 




J0u.(tLlccLtion5 Uoatd 

The Publications Board supervises all the student publications. Its chief 
duty is the election of managing editors and business managers of The Nugget. 
The Tiger, and The Handbook. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

Jack F. Lawson ------- Chairman 

Dr. George L. Anderson ------- Faculty Representative 

Alfred Owens -------- Representative of A. S. C. C. 

Mary Ella Gilmore ------ Managing Editor of the Nugget 

Laird Smith -------- Managing Editor of the Tiger 



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LAMAR GILMORE SMITH ARMSTRONG 

WEIDMANN HENDERSON FENNELL 



Manaaet5 

Homecoming Chairman ---------- Bibb Lamar 

Magna Pan Pan - William Henderson and James Fennell 

Regit Teggun — Frederick Weidmann, Mary Ella Gilmore, Laird Smith and 
Willis Armstrong 



Publication* 






LUZILLA EUBANK 
Managing Editor 



ORVILLE TRAINOR 
Business Manager 



ike litudent -Handbook 

The Student Handbook is published annually by the Associated Students 
of Colorado College under the supervision of the publications board. 

It endeavors to acquaint the new student with the prominent features of 
the campus, and serves as a guide and reference for the upper classman. 

This year's book contains greetings from the administration for new 
students and information concerning scholastic requirements, the constitution 
and by-laws, customs and traditions, and general data regarding campus 
organizations and athletic activity. 




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MARY ELLA GILMORE 

Managing Editor 



FREDERICK WM. WEIDMANN 
Business Manager 



A/uaaet 

As has been the case in former years the 1937 Nugget has attempted to 
catch and portray all the moods of the campus. This is only a snapshot of 
Colorado College in which we cannot possibly include the complete panorama 
of campus life, however, we have picked out bits that may, through memory, 
be patched into the whole. It is our hope that in future years this book may 
recall old friends and eventful days spent on the Colorado College campus. 

We take this opportunity to applaud for their help in the production of this 
book William Henderson, Orville Trainor. Ruth Gilmore, James Fennel, and 
Robert Boyle. 






U ■ 







SUTLIFF CHELEY TRAINOR GILMORE VVEIDMANN BOYLE L. SMITH 

EUBANK McCONNELL R. GILMORE ABDULLAH FENNELL HARMSTON HENDERSON 

HURLEY NELSON DE LONGCHAMP STONE D. JOHNSON MARTIN MASON 

LAWSON JONES E. SMITH JOHNSTONE JOHNSON 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor ----- - Mary Ella Gilmore 

Associate Editors William Henderson, Sherman Sutlift 

Sports Editor -- Orville Trainor 

Assistant Sports Editor Gordon Harmston 

Photography Jack Cheley, Wilkin Johnstone 

Art Editor - William Henderson 

Assistant Art Editors ----- Maureen Smith, Dorothy Johnson 
Editorial Assistants — Ruth Gilmore, Mary Alice McConnell, Phyllis Abdullah, 
Mary Ann Stone, Mary Lou Johnson, Betty Jean Jones, Lucille Nelson, 
Grace Edith Mason, Barbara Hurley, Mary de Longchamp, Harriet Sut- 
liff, Luzilla Eubank, Ed Smith, Willis Armstrong, Laird Smith, Dorothy 
May Lawson. 

MANAGERIAL STAFF 

Manager --------- Frederick Wm. Weidmann 

Assistant Managers Robert Boyle, James Fennell 



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LAIRD SMITH 
Managing Editor 



WILLIS ARMSTRONG 
Business Manager 



7ne liGet 



The Tiger, weekly publication submitted by the students of Colorado 
College, has been an active organ of student interest and opinion this year. 
Distinctive as the only newsmagazine in the Rocky Mountain region, The 
Tiger serves as a more personal contact between the College and alumni as 
well as a translation of student life. 

Offices of the editorial staff have been moved from the printing company 
to rooms in Montgomery Hall to make news reporting more efficient and to 
enable more students to participate. Staff members cooperated in the installa- 
tion of a publications all-college dance, the Regit-Teggun, which proved to 
be one of the most successful enterprises of the college year. 

The managing editor and advertising manager are elected each spring by 
the Publications board. The new managing editor assumes responsibility the 
first week after spring vacation, while the advertising manager enters office 
the first week of the following scholastic year. 



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Colorado College Newsmagazine 

Managing Editor ---------- Laird K. Smith 

Advertising Manager -------- Willis E. Armstrong 

Associate Editor --------- Dorothy May Lawson 

Campus Editor ----------- Sherman Sutliff 

Feature Editors - John Damgaard, Edwin Smith 

Society Editor ----------- Helen Wood 

Sports Editor ----------- Dick Alderson 

Art Editor ---- - Bill Henderson 

Make-Up Editor ----------- Claire Proctor 

Assistant Business Managers ----- Jack Murray, Art Kruggel 

Assistant Campus Editors — Harold Mulnix, Rossa Blair Mosher, Bill Boyes. 
and Harriet Sutliff. 

News Staff — Russell Meredith, Bob Boyle, James Smith, Joe Massie, Hildegard 
Neill, Wanetta White, Vic McVey, Bob Hatch, Edwin Smith, Eleanor 
Harter, Jane Underhill, Lester Seelig, Irma Marker, Mary Harris, Betty 
Yaeger, Betty Adams, Bill Hover, Jim Campbell, Mary Ella Gilmore, and 
Fred Weidmann. 

Society Staff — Lois Jean Stevison, Dorothy May Thompson, Elizabeth Cope- 
land, Lois Livingston, Kathryn McLean, Mary Musser, Joan Chapman. 
Jeanne Hauser, Genevieve Walberg. 

Sports Staff — Joe Massie, Bill Halley, Wilmot Nichols. Harriet Anne Frank. 
Feature Staff — Ellen Perry, Elizabeth Copeland, Maurine Smith, Mary Helen 

Cameron, Marian Garritson, Betty Yaeger, Vic McVey, Jane Green. 
Copy Readers -------- Luzilla Eubank, Edwin Smith 

Typists -------- Ruth Gilmore, Dorothy McKeown 



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One of the most colorful and enthusiastic groups of Colorado College 
rooters to be seen at the conference home games is the Tiger Club. This 
organization, composed of sixty coeds, who may be recognized by their 
orange sweaters and black skirts, is the women's pep club of the College and 
is made up of representatives from the four sororities and the independent 
group. The members must attend all home games in uniform in order to retain 
membership in the organization. 

MEMBERS 

President --------- Ruth Doughty 

Vice-President - - Mary Barkalow 

Secretary ---------- Alice Cary 

Treasurer ------- Betty Jean Galligan 

Sue Braerton Jeanne Collison 

Martha Francis Howell Doris Rhoads 

Ellen Perry Marjorie Combs 

June Mary Chapman Jule Hutchinson 

Lydia Douthirt Helen Zick 

Virginia Waters Martha Lou Phillips 

Esther Edwards Marguerite McFarland 

Genevieve Walberg Lucille Hampton 

Elisabeth Askling Betty Trueblood 

Marion Garritson Irma Marker 

Jane Green Ruth Ann Johnson 

Ruth Doughty Peggy Utterback 

Marguerite Ridge Maidie Rothgerber 

Ruth Martin Betty Clark 

Evelyn Peterson Adele Hartner 

Marjorie Fender Betty McKee 

Agnes Sands Maxine Jarvis 

Berta Trotter Evelyn Pick 

Elynor Galloway Eleanor Pick 

Pauline Anderson Pauline Kurachi 

Doris Shock Betty Jean Galligan 

Mary E. Figge Mary Bledsoe 

Mary E. Gilmore Marcille Wood 

Alice Cary Charline Clark 

Mary Gilmore Louise Phelps 

Mary Barkalow Alice Howe 

Claire Procter Betty Heckert 

Luzilla Eubank Dorothy Johnson 

Virginia Collison Ann Eastwood 



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The men's pep organization in Colorado College, which is closely associated 
with the Tiger Club and is their only rival in enthusiastic school spirit; is 
known as the Growler's Club. This group is composed of representatives of 
the different fraternities and the independents who are elected to membership 
in their sophomore year. They, like the Tiger Club, attend all conference home 
games in a body and are the center of all student enthusiasm. 





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The Dog Club is perhaps the most unique organization on the campus. 
Membership is attained by passing the gruelling test of biting the head off a live 
water dog, no fooling. Probationers are transformed at the annual banquet, 
at which time they receive a certificate of transformation. 





MEMBERS 






Faculty 




Pres. Davies, 


Honorary Dr. 


Rawles 


Prof. Gilmore 


Dr. 


Service, Honorary 


Richard Rogers 


Dalton Jenkins 


Ruth Gilmore 


Jack Middle 


Larry Effinger 


Stephen Lamme 


Joseph Rustin 


George Cribari 


Bill Hover 


Ronald Rolph 


Betty Yeager 


Mary Alice McConnell 


Doris Shock 


Mary Lou Waldron 


Jeannie Barkalow 


Houston Buchanan 


John Fowler 


Mary deLongchamp 


Ralph Smith 


Ernest Werner 


Mary Helen Cameron 


Carl Swartz 


Betty Adams 


Mary Figge 


Dale Ashbaugh 


Bernice Vessey 


Don Makins 


Letitia Rawles 


Marjorie Combs 


Joanne Daily 


M. E. Gilmore 


Irma Marker 


George Spaulding 


Bob Rehm 


Evelyn Peterson 


John Hill 


Harry Man- 


Jean Hauser 


Christopher Ditson 


Bob Summers 


Ned McWilliams 


Andrew Brown 


Esther Edwards 


Bob Sutton 


Bob Norcross 


Bob Livingston 


Mary Anne Stone 


Mary Louise Caton 


Paul Weston 


Geraldine Saviers 


Bob Scudder 


Ruth Bischof 




Grace Edith Mason 



'Peb&tinG 



The Debating team saw action this year on a number of occasions. They 
appeared in Denver at the Speech Conference. On March 9. Colorado College 
debating team was host to the debating group from MacMurrey College, 
Abilene, Texas. 

MEMBERS 

Laura Work Bert Reuler 

John Dickey Leonard Sutton 

James Fennell F. R. Wiley 



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BOVA1RD BLEDSOE TRUMBULL WEDDINGTON HOWE 

KURACHI PICK C. CLARK BRADLEY WOOD 

B. CLARK PICK GALLIGAN CRAWFORD 

Campus Club was organized and has been carried on for the purpose of 
providing another social outlet and cultural opportunity for every girl on the 
campus. 

Its membership includes: 

President Eleanor Trumbull 

Vice-President - Evalyn Pick 

Secretary - Pauline Kurachi 

Treasurer -- - Mary Ellen Duggan 

House Manager - Eleanor Pick 

Social Chairman ------- Marie Bradley 

Betty Jean Galligan Betty Dewing 

Marie Ostendorf Charlene Clark 

Jean Crawford Beverly Clark 

Margaret Ellen Martin Harriet Cameron 

Betty Blair Mary Bledsoe 

Jean Wilson Isabel Seeley 

Louise Schiddel Alice Howe 

Dixie Weddington Louise Phelps 

Janet Bovaird Barbeth Staffel 
Marcille Wood 



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Koshare, under the direction of Arthur Sharp, is the dramatic club of 
Colorado College. It has presented so far this year "The Black Flamingo" by 
Sam Janney, a Christmas play, "Eager Heart," "Night Over Taos" by Max- 
well Anderson and "Spring Dance" by Philip Barry. 

The purpose of Koshare is to develop dramatic talent, a greater interest 
in drama, and to give entertainment. 




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RODGERS 
WELDON 

WILKINS 


COMBS 
WOOD 


GREEN 

MEMBERS 


STRANG 
KELT 

SWARTZ 


SHIVERS 
RIDDOCH 


John Dooley 
Ruth Doughty 
Otis Eliot 
Larry Effinger 






Keith Riddoch 
Joe Rustin 
Marcus Shivers 
Charles Strang 




Jane Green 
Dalton Jenkins 
Robert Kelt 
Jack Middle 
Beth Ritter 
Richard Rodgers 




Carl Swartz 
Bud Udick 
George Villars 
Walter Weldon 
David Wilkins 
Helen Wood 





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THOMSON. BOOTHROVD. GALLUP. STEVENSON. HILL 

SCHIDDEL. DOWSON, FULLER. GRIFFITH. VAN SAUN. HOVER. ENGDAHL 

FONTIUS. WORK. WILSON, LEE. CLARK. EVES. GRAHAM 

OUONNELL. O'DONNELL. LAPHAM. MOSHER. BISCHOF. CRAWFORD 



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Every Tuesday morning a choir adds to the beauty of the regular chapel 
service. This choir under the direction of Frederick Boothroyd is made up 
of the following members: 



Ruth Bischof 
Mary de Longchamp 
Mary Gayle Dowson 
Dorothy Lapham 
Barbara Lee 
Rossa Blair Mosher 
Kathleen O'Donnell 
Margaret O'Donnell 
Martha Lemon 
Betty Ruth Treece 
Jean Wilson 
Laura Work 
Jean Crawford 
Gordon Gallup 
Alvin Johnston 
John Stevenson 
Ruth Boatright 
Elisabeth Clark 
Jean Fontius 



Mary Ann McBride 
Felicia Mongone 
Sue Williams 
Betty Yeager 
Louise Schiddel 
Justine Fuller 
H. L. Engdahl 
Miller Eves 
Donald Graham 
John Hill 
Bill Hover 
Jack Middle 
Philip Thompson 
Richard Rodgers 
Charles Strang 
Bill Sheehan 
Dick Van Saun 
Gene Griffith 



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ROLPH LORENZ MACE 

MacDONALD REULER HALL 

SNIDER DAMGAARD PELZ 



DICKEY 


TUDOR 


HENDERSON 


FISHER 


SMITH 


HILLYARD 


AUTREY 


CLARK 


PALMER 



-QLpha Kappa )^5i 



Alpha Kappa Psi, professional business fraternity, is composed of upper- 
class students in the Judson M. Bemis Department of Business Administration 
and Economics. Its fundamental purpose is to bring together students inter- 
ested in the same field or phases of it. The principal functions of the fraternity 
are: to carry on the department of business administration's plant visitation 
program, to provide a contact with the city's business men, to conduct research 
projects, to secure speakers on business topics, and to assist members in their 
chosen fields after graduation through alumni organizations. 

The highlight of the year is the annual dinner given in the spring for local 
business men with prominent speakers such as last year's when the governor 
of Colorado and a justice of the state supreme court spoke on current business 
topics. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 



David W. Crabb 
Melvin Weimer 

Dick Alderson 
Don Autrey 
Nathaniel Cary 
Russell Clark 
John Damgaard 
John Dickey 
George Fisher 
Gaylord Frenzel 
Kenneth Hall 
William Hillyard 
Art Kruggel 
Loring Lennox 
Murray Lorenz 



MEMBERS 



Jacob Swart 



Charles Macdonald 
Gordon Mace 
Holcombe Palmer 
Edward Pelz 
Bert Reuler 
Ronald Rolph 
Ernest Schwertscharf 
Edwin Smith 
Sherman Sutliff 
Bill Tudor 
George Villars 
William Henderson 
Gordon Snider 



tM dti. *A 

p p. gi 

ii & .Jl 

r 



GATES 


SARCHET 




HILL 


ARMSTRONG 


SHEEHAN 


HOWARD 


OWENS 


BRUCE 


CLELLAND 



(fUe &lubi 



The Men's and Women's Glee Clubs function sometimes separately and 
sometimes together. They are strictly extra-curricular and each year charms 
are awarded to members who have served the club well. Awards of charms 
were made for the season of 1935-36 to the following: Mary Barkalow. Robert 
Boyle. James Colling, Curtis Gates, Richard Hall, Ed Little, Theodore Little. 
Katherine McCuan, Dale Owens and William Sheehan. 

The prime aim of the club is to musically unify the college and serve as an 
emissary and advertiser for the entire institution. 

During 1936-1937 the clubs have taken a trip to Longmont. They have 
appeared for the Christmas program of the Colorado Springs Music Club as 
well as a radio broadcast on KVOR. It is expected that they will sing the 
choral parts of Gluck's opera "Orpheus" in the spring music festival in May. 



f> P) A O r > O ^ 




i 
* 







LAWSON HOSKINS BUTTON KELLEY WILLIAMS PROCTOR SEERIE 

HARRINGTON WHITE FRANK WILKINS RITTER McFARLAND 

MONGONE HOWE 



Men s (flee (?UI> 



Robert Boyle 
Maurice Brown 
Robert Bruce 
Thomas Cleland 
James Colling 
Curtis Gates 
John Hill 
John Howard 



Alvin Johnson 
Charles Juhnke 
Robert Lind 
Theodore Little 
Dale Owens 
Earl Sarchet 
William Sheehan 



U/omen5 (flee &lu(t 



Jeanie Barkalow 
Mary Barkalow 
Jane Button 
Harriet Anne Frank 
Marjorie Harrington 
Mary Harris 
Helen Hoskins 
Alice Howe 
Dorothy May Lawson 
Marguerite McFarland 



Felicia Mongone 
Claire Proctor 
Beth Ritter 
Virginia Seerie 
Barbara White 
Sue Williams 
Betty Yaeger 
Margaret Wilkins 
Margaret Kelley, pianist 



Faculty Sponsor, James Sykes 



H «l-> o 









o 

£* 



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2 



SPANISH CLUB 



n £> 



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GILMORE 

1ARVIS 

PICK 



© £1 Ci 




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C\ A A \S 



FRENCH CLUB 



WRIGHT ANDERSON 

LEMON TREECE 

DAILY PHELPS 



ANDREAE 

GONZALES 

HARLAN 



WILSON 
HETHERLY 

SWAN 








o 


9 


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HA 




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GERMAN CLUB 



SUTTON CHAPMAN RENFRO 

BISCHOF SAVIERS ROE 

NELSON HUGHES PETERSON 




WAHTOLA 
CLARK 
WEDDINGTON 



CRAWFORD 
GALLOWAY 
OSTENDORF 



£-uteipi 



Euterpe is a Colorado College music society devoted to the appreciation 
and enjoyment of music. Meetings are held bi-weekly either in Perkins Hall 
or in the homes of the members. Each Euterpe member participates in two 
programs a year. All students of music registered in the college are. ex post 
facto, members. 

The outstanding program of the season was given at Fine Arts Center, 
February 26, in which Canon Douglas of Denver delivered a lecture on 
sources of Bach themes and Miss Marjorie Hornbein, also of Denver, played a 
program of Bach on the piano. 



MEMBERS 



Dick Alderson 
John Alexander 
Charles MacLellan 
Jane Wahtola 
Jean Crawford 
Louise Schiddel 
Betty Clark 
Elsie Swenson 
Barbara Ann Lewis 
Marjorie Combs 
Marie Ostendorf 
Margaret Kelly 
Nellie Kelly 
Helen Woodson 
Jean Bigas 
Dixie Weddington 



Dorothy Holmes 
Bill Sheehan 
Andy Brown 
Harrison Gray 
Loring Lennox 
Helen Huffman 
Eleanor Sue Galloway 
Gene Griffith 
Miller Eves 
Beatrice Snider 
Adeline Zanotti 
Tom Hoe 
Francis Wright 
Kenneth Woods 
Marv Louise Davies 



'omecomm 



9 



Homecoming this year, most cherished day among college traditions of 
good-fellowship, surpassed all previous Homecomings for entertaining the 
alumni of Colorado College. 

The celebration began Friday, October 30th, due to a holiday that was 
granted as a result of a student petition. At six p. m. house decorations of the 
various fraternities were judged. Lambda Chi Alpha won first prize for the 
best decorated house. Beta Theta Pi second, and Phi Gamma Delta third. 

At seven-thirty the students held a torchlight parade through the business 
district, which was followed by a pep meeting and bonfire at Cossit stadium. 
The enthusiasm for the day was concluded with an all-College dance held in 
the ballroom of the Broadmoor Hotel, where Miss Helen Zick, a member of 
the sophomore class and of Kappa Kappa Gamma was crowned Homecoming 
queen. 

Saturday, October the 30th, started with a huge demonstrative parade, 
forming at Platte avenue and Tejon. The parade, led by the College band, 
marched through the business districts, making occasional stops for College 
yells and songs illustrative of Homecoming spirit. Honors for the best 
decorated float went to Phi Gamma Delta for the fraternities with their float, 
"Polish Old Boulder," and to Gamma Phi Beta among the sororities for 
"Clocking Boulder." The parade had some of the cleverest floats ever seen 
here, many using Buffalo heads in various manners. The streets were crowded 
to witness the parade and with a warm sun shining the occasion was in the 
finest holiday spirit. 

Windows in downtown stores took on a collegiate festive attire in honor 
of Homecoming at Colorado College. Tributes to the College and the Tiger 



football team, together with welcome signs to alumni, home for the big reunion 
of their Alma Mater, were the themes for many windows in stores owned by 
College boosters. Outstanding merchants who participated in Homecoming 
by decorating their windows were: Giddings', Perkins-Shearer, Pikes Peak 
Floral, Derns, Robbins, Phillips-Smith, Sign of the Rose and Johnson-English. 

After the Homecoming game all the fraternities and sororities had open- 
house for all the visiting alumni. The day's celebrations came to a close with 
a dance at the Yacht Club of the Broadmoor Hotel. 



PanPc 



an 

With Bill Henderson and Jimmy Fennell as student managers and Arthur 
G. Sharp, Jr., as faculty advisor, this year's Magna Pan Pan was acclaimed 
by all attending as the best performance ever presented by the Associated 
Students of Colorado College. 

Phi Gamma Delta produced the best act among the fraternities and proved 
their worth as the outstanding singers of the campus by their performance, 
which was composed entirely of songs. The glee club, led by Harold Stillman, 
was splendid in contributing several well known songs, including a few college 
songs. One of the cleverest acts was their version of "The Martins and 
the Coys.'' The famed trio, composed of Harold Stillman, Jim Naismith and 
Curtis Gates, had a very novel way of presenting harmony songs. Gates also 
sang a solo, "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm." The acts were heightened 
by the setting which was a large neon sign portraying their pin. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma presented the best act among the sororities, the theme 
of their act was "Memories," and was a well rounded and finished performance 



with Barbara White as the bartender, relating events of the gay nineties which 
were then pantomimed in old time costumes. Contrast was shown by a chorus 
clad in white evening gowns, which sang many old, but well loved songs. 
Helen Hoskins was the only soloist on their program. 

Highlights of the Kappa act were Jeanie Barkalow and Peggy Simpson, 
who gave a clever tap dance of school days, and Mary Harris and Helen Zick, 
two Harlem coons who really strutted their stuff. 

The Tiger and the Nugget staffs expressed their interest in Pan Pan by 
presenting a third cup to the organization presenting the most original act. 
Gamma Phi Beta were winners of the originality cup with a clever idea enact- 
ing some of the better known ads. The highlight of their program was their 
presentation of a Coca Cola ad, consisting of a novel tap dance by Marguerite 
Ridge, Billie Bennett, and Harriett Boutin. 

As new addition to Pan Pan this year the managers presented a cash prize 
of two dollars and fifty cents to the individuals presenting the best curtain acts 
between the major acts. This prize was won by Jack Middle and Bobby Kelt. 
This comedy team brought down the house with their version of "One, Two, 
Button Your Shoe." 

Pan Pan this year was devoted entirely to a vaudeville theme, this being 
the result of a poll conducted among the students to determine their preference. 
All acts were of a high class caliber and showed that all organizations spent 
much time in preparing them. The winning acts were later presented at the 
Chief Theater in Colorado Springs. 



Out 
■fldvettiieti 



SJn dedication 



• To the loyal merchants of this our college town. 

• Were it not for them this book could not be 
published. 

/Iaet5 

• Look at the situation from this angle. 

• Should you venture down-town, on the afternoon 
of one of our football games, you will find practi- 
cally all of the business establishments either short- 
handed or at least minus their executive force. 
They are at the game, truly our loyal supporters. 

• Notice too; the number of business men at any of 
our athletic events, Koshare plays, at the annual 
Pan Pan, and not forgetting their co-operation at 
the time of home-coming. There is not a college 
day when they are not active in each of our un- 
dertakings. 

• Every one of our publications are always conscious 
of the absolute approval of the business men, at all 
times. 

• Thus Tigers; it is the bounded duty, thru loyalty 
to our own college, to support in every way those 
merchants who uphold us, OUR ADVERTISERS. 



HENDRIE 8c 
BOLTHOFF 
MFG. AND 
SUPPLY CO. 

Distributing 
Automotive 
Supplies and 
Equipment 

• 
General, 
Electrical and 
Industrial 
Equipment 

"Since 1861" 

• 

211 East Colorado Avenue 
Colorado Springs - - - Colorado 


FRATERNITY PINS 

• We have in stock all fraternity and 
sorority pins. 

• Call and visit our factory which is 
located in Denver. 

• Three day delivery guaranteed. 

• A complete line of crested jewelry. 

Clyde W. Blanchard Jewelry Co. 

MANUFACTURING FRAT JEWELERS 
428 16th St. Denver, Colorado 


ENTERPRISE TENT 
& AWNING CO. 

J. J. McTigue - H. B. Blackburn 

o 
Tents — Awnings 
Porch Curtains 
Auto Trimming 
Camp Equipment 

• 

123 SOUTH NEVADA AVENUE 
Phone Main 1264 


COURTESY OF 

JOHN METZLER 

AND HIS 

ORCHESTRA 


Quality Shoes 

Cleverly Fashioned 
Right Prices 

Hosiery and Bags to Match 

FELTMAN & CURME 

ONE SOUTH TEJON 


FIRST AND OLDEST IVORY SOAP LAUNDRY IN THE UNITED STATES 
A Service for Every Purse 

The Pearl Laundry Company 

329-331 NORTH TEJON 



IF.' 



IT'S NEW 

IT'S AT 

DEUFEltt 



inc. 



APPAREL SHOP 
23 South Tejon Main 87; 



Metal Products Co. 

C. H. Decker 
ROOFING 

Sheet Metal Work 
Gas and Coal Furnaces 

501 West Colorado Ave. Alain 58 



SUPERIOR 

DYERS and CLEANERS 

"Knit Garment Blocking Our Specialty' 
109 E. Bijou Main 1 



WILLSON'S MARKET 

"Fine Foods" 

1528 NORTH TEJON STREET 

Telephones Main 984-985 

Hourly Delivery Service 



CORSAGES 
BOUTONNIERES 
BOUQUETS 



(if** 



r 



720 W. Caramillo 
Colorado Spiings 



Telephone 
Main 3685 



George's Place 

HAMBURGER AND BARBECUE 
SANDWICHES 



BUY 'EM BY THE SACK 
222 S. Tejon Phone Main 1368 




? HUNGRY ? 

barbecue 

MIDWAY BETWEEN 
COLORADO SPRINGS AND MANITOU 



Gray Rose Beauty 
Shoppe 

9 North Tejon Street 

Main 2701 

Permanent Waving a Specialty 




Colorado College 

Thurston J. Davies, LL.D., President 



Just three hundred years ago was founded this country's first institution 
of higher learning, a liberal arts college. Today the necessity for the liberal 
arts college is as great as when the first one was founded. 

Colorado College is a liberal arts college of the old tradition distinguished 
by its faithful adherence to the principle that the relation between the student 
and the teacher should be a personal one. 

The national standing of the College is evidenced by the fact that 
students from thirty-four states were in attendance during the current year. 

Information in regard to Entrance Requirements, Scholarships and 
Courses of Study may be obtained by addressing Thomas H. Rawles, 
Director of Admission, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 



Colorado's Oldest Dry Cleaning 
Business 




PHONES 1/21 1222 



Particular Work for Particular 
Persons 



Quality Work at 
Minimum Prices 



A. C. QUIER, Proprietor 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

The Pueblo Star Journal 

and 

The Pueblo Chieftain 



FRANK S. HOAG 

Publisher 



FRANK S. HOAG, Jr 
Asst. Publisher 



COURTESY OF THE 

Ed H. Honnen 
Construction Company 



65 Years 

In the Pikes Peak Region 

NEWTON'S 

LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING CO. 

Lumbering Along Since 1872 

PLUMBING - HEATING - GAS FITTING 

Personal Attention to Repair Work 
All Work Guaranteed 

Simmons Plumbing 8C Heating Co. 



Office, Main 789 



119 N. Cascade Residence, Main 4046 



CHUCK" MYERS 

AUTO SPECIALTIES 
AND SERVICE 

Phone Main 301 

12 North Weber 



The 
Seldomridge Grain Company 

FLOUR, GRAIN, HAY, BEANS 



Makers of 

DAIRY, CHICKEN, TURKEY FEEDS 

Seeds, Fertilizers 



Phone Main 12 
Coloi 



21 S. Cascade 
Springs, Colo. 



WALTER'S 

IT SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 

"It's in the Brewing" 

YOU'LL LIKE IT THE BEST OF ALL 




Hutchinson Battery Service 



We Specialize 



Full. 



'«>■ 



/ Spark Plugs 

' / //,. Carburetors 

'i'V.'iy Generators 

Batteries 

Starters 
V/- f> Lights 

Fone Main 240 J 'o-~, ■ Horns 

4 E. Kiowa 

Motor Tune Up 



CmSD v * 




On Candy 

Counters 

All Over 

This 

Region 



With 28 Years of 

Experience in Fine 

Caramels Back of It 



year. . . 

the region^ 
Social Genter 







BROADMOOR 

COLORADO SPRINGS 

Special Rates to 

SORORITIES and FRATERNITIES 

for Banquets, Dinners, Swimming 



?? 



eVe 



ti. 



t^ers 



^ 



9W 

Special ^ariy 
^Reservations 

Gall 
£Main 4180 

^> 

Rates on Request 



JAMES BARKER SMITH, Resident Manager 



Todd's Shine Parlor 


ALUTERATtVE SYNONYMS* 
EUPHONIOUS W-» A XI V^X! Ii *■*->• 

1 OW-PRICED. 

L0RIG'S-s^ 

^^& V S& MEN'S STORE 




While You Wait 

FIRST CLASS 

SHOE REPAIRING 




Visit 

27y 2 N. Te 


us in our beautiful neu 
jon Phone M 


store 
tin 3218-W 


Efje Hato Jllortuarp 

WITHIN THE MEANS OF ALL 

116 North Nevada 
COLORADO SPRINGS 

Cripple Creek Victor 


ZIM'S 

CxbiaJbie 
BREAD 


ZECHA-DONLON-ADAMS 
Conoco Service Station 

WASHING • GREASING 
TIRE REPAIRING 

Nevada at Cache La Poudre 
Phone Main 5+41 


WE WILL ACCOMMODATE 
PRIVATE PARTIES REASONABLY 

NAVAJO-HOGAN 

Bar Service 
2817 North Nevada 




Beer 



Sandwiches 



OPEN ALL NIGHT" 

GOODBAR'S RESTAURANT 

"PUNK" HARTER, Prop. 



2915 N. Nevada 



Dinners 



HART 

SCHAFFNER 
& MARX 

CLOTHES 



□ 



FOR 
COLLEGE 

MEN 



WAYMIRE'S 

IN COLORADO SPRINGS 



The Dieter Bookbinding 
Company 

DENVER, COLORADO 
1130 23rd Street 



Library and School Book 
Rebinding 



MAGAZINE AND ART BINDINGS 



McCarthy & company 

Offers the Best Service in 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 




Visit Denver's Most Distinctive Uptown Bar 

LANDE'S 

"A place for the discriminating" 
Phone York 9442 FINE DINNERS 3130 E. Colfax Ave. 


Phone CTAD °PP° site 
Main 717- W J 1 AlV North Park 

LUNCH 

We Specialize in Hamburgers 
and All Kinds of Sandwiches 

Complete At All 
Dinners 216 N. Tejon Hours 


Your Clothes Cleaned and Pressed 

AT 

The Peter Pan Cleaners 

Quality Work in a Quality Style 
At a Price You Can Afford 

429 S Tejon Main 5050 


JAMES HOWARD 

BARBER SHOP 

19 East Bijou Street 
Colorado Springs 


LEVINE'S 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards 
Picture Framing — Artists' Supplies 

111 NORTH TEJON MAIN 328 


THE G. R. LEWIS 

WHOLESALE DRUG 
COMPANY 

We Serve Your Druggist 

228 North Tejon 


Telephone Main 548-549 

WESTERN 
STATES 

GROCERY CO. 

WHOLESALE GROCERIES 

17-19 North Cascade 


COOD TASTY FOCI) AT THE 

Whimpy Snack Shop 

"A Whimpy's Meal" 
Opposite H. S. On Platte 

Telephone Delivery Service 
Main 1685-J Curb Service 


The Colorado Laundry 

and 

Alf Owens Service 

Are Prepared to Serve You Tigers 
Quickly, Reasonably and Well 

516 West Colorado Ave. Phone Main 517 



H. L. STANDLEY-Photographer 

224 NORTH TEJON 

HAND COLORED VIEWS 

Commercial Work, Finishing, Copying, Lantern Slides, Frames, Enlargements 


QfNTLERS HOTEL 

^^ ^ Colorado Springs' Largest and 
Finest Hotel 

Air-Cooled COPPER GROVE 
and COFFEE SHOP 

Copper Grove for dinner dancing to music of 
famed orchestras. Coffee Shop serving Antlers 
Hotel standards in foods at popular prices. 


The 

Heyse Sheet Metal Works 

Incorporated 

Tin, Sheet Iron and 
Copper Work 

219 North Weber Alain 552 


The Wandell 8C Lowe 

TRANSFER & STORAGE 
COMPANY 

T 
Phone Main 97 

T 
Office 8 E. Kiowa St. 


MAIN 340 

DYTRI & CIMINO 

Ready to Fill Your Needs 
2907 NORTH NEVADA 





COLORADO SPRINGS FINE ARTS CENTER 

(Formerly Broadmoor Art Academy) 
Summer School, June 28 to August 21, 1937 

Life Class - - Boardman Robinson 

Landscape Class ----- - Henry Varnum Poor 

Mural Decoration ------- Boardman Robinson 

Etching and Lithography Lawrence Barrett 

Sculpture Class if requested by a sufficient number. 

Tuition for each class - $15.00 for four weeks 

Evening Life Class - $ 8.00 for four weeks 

Winter School opening September 27, 1937 
Address : Stanley Lothrop, General Director 



WHEN IN DENVER 

Drop in and see Walt, Teddy and the C C Gang! 



"Coors and Tivoli on draught or in bottles" 



Ga. 1416 



3759 Lipan 



GREETINGS FROM 

COLLIER LUMBER 
COMPANY 

Building Materials 




POPCORN 



Always 
Deliriously Fresh! 



Busy Corner, COLORADO SPRINGS 
Soda Strings Pavilion, MANITOU 



TIGERS 

For Your Athletic Equipment 

AND 

Sporting Goods 

W. I. LUCAS 

SPORTING GOODS CO. 
Main 900 120 N. Tejon St. 



City Office Supply Co. 

118 N. Tejon St. 

Come in and see us or call us for — 
TYPEWRITERS 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 
Repairing or Renting of Typewriter 



BREAKFASTS 


DINNERS 


THE 


NEVADA 


. LUNCH 


8 North 


Nevada 


We Invite Yc 
LUNCHES 


ur Patronage 

SNACKS 


Palmer and Joslyn, Inc. 


COURTESY OF 

THE IDEAL CLEANERS 


Growers — Shippers — Distributors 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

Wholesale Only 


■■Where the charm of newness is restored" 

MAIN 

1846 


Colorado Springs, Colorado 


226 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 0. D. Potts, Prop. 



REAL ESTATE 

Season and Permanent Rentals 

INSURANCE 
of All Kinds 

MARTHA RICH 

WITH 

ROWENA DASHWOOD 

415 Colorado Springs National Bank Building 
Main 1564 


AUTOMOBILE 

TRADES 
ASSOCIATION 

of 

COLORADO SPRINGS 

• 

ACACIA GARAGE 

HUDSON TERRAPLANE 




COMPLIMENTS OF 
THE 


O 

ADAMS MOTOR CO. 

CADILLAC LA SALLE 

• 


J. S. BROWN 


ALTA VISTA GARAGE 

STUDEBAKER 


MERCANTILE CO. 


• 

BIRDSALL STOCKDALE 
MOTOR CO. 

PACKARD NASH LAFAYETTE 
• 

CADY L. DANIELS, INC. 

CHEVROLET OLDSMOBILE 


Acme Ticket Company 


Reserved Seat Tickets 
for Every Purpose 

12 and 14 East Kiowa Street 


• 

COLORADO SPRINGS 
MOTOR CO. 

CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH 


COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 


e 
MARKSHEFFEL MOTOR CO. 

DODGE PLYMOUTH 

• 

NELSON EUBANK 
MOTOR CO. 

PLYMOUTH DE SOTO 


OJ 


Telephone Main 2520 

m 


u 


wew 


• 

STRANG GARAGE CO. 

BUICK PONTIAC 


Finest Foods 
and Liquors 


117 East Pikes Peak Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 


• 

VOLLMER BROS. CO. 

FORD LINCOLN LINCOLN ZEPHYR 



EVERYTHING 

NEW 

• NEW Management and Policies 

• NEW Awareness of Community 

Service Obligation 

• NEW Appreciation of Radio 

Showmanship 

• NEW Transmitter and Equipment 

• NEW Studios and Offices 

• NEW Program Features 

KVOR 

COLORADO SPRINGS 

'The Voice of the Rockies" Studios : Antlers Hotel 

MEMBER STATION 
COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



TIPTON 
STUDIO 



Main 5974 



129 N. Tejon 



The Friendly Studio 
of Satisfied Customers 



Distinctive Portraits made in the 
Home or Studio 



~Jk& 



■•entcin 



PRINTING COMPANY 



COLORADO 
SPRINGS 



c. c. 

BEFORE and AFTER 

OR DURING 

The C. C. student desiring a business 
education will find our facilities fit into 
his schedule, before, after or during his 
school day. 

Day School — Night School — Summer 
School — Start Any Time. 

Blair's Business College 

De Graff Bldg. Colorado Springs 



SEE THE 
WONDERFUL 



CAVE OF THE WINDS 



Watches on Credit 

Bulova Hamilton 

Elgin Gruen 

Westficld Tavannes 

With Martin's Easy Credit Plan 

NO MONEY DOWN 



MA|JIN$ 

q) 5£TT€R- J€W£LR.y 

121 N. Tejon 





Denver's Only Earge 

Exclusive Man's Store 

is the Home of 

Hart, Schaffner 
8C Marx 

—the world's largest makers 
of Men's Better Clothing! 

U 
COTTRELL'S 

J-ke yvlau i estate 

621 SIXTEENTH STREET 

Denver, Colorado 



Arrow Shirts 



Interwoven Socks 



Courteous Treatment 

Dependable Merchandise 

Reasonable Prices 

HEIDELBERG'S 

10 North Tejon Street 
Bietmore Suits Maeeory Hats 



COURTESY OF 
THE 

VAN BRIGGLE 
POTTERY CO. 



USE 

Florman's Paints 
and Varnishes 



A Colorado Product of the 
Highest Quality 



The FLORMAN 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 

PUEBLO 



Home of 

HART SCHAKFNER & MARX 
CLOTHES 

GASSMAN 

PUEBLO 

Arrow Shirts Interwoven Sox 



"Say, Fellows, go where-the 
Gang goes" 

Ask to see the new Xervac Machine 

Ben and Ed's Barber Shop 



Collegians All 
Say It With 
Flowers from 




Phone 214 
22 North Tejon 



RE- UPHOLSTERING 

QUALITY MATERIALS 

I SATISFACTION l 
|| GUARANTEED i| 

PERKINS AUTO TRIM 

2 7- S« CASCADE 



HOWARD'S CAFE 

"Where College Men Meet" 

THE OLD RELIABLE PLACE 

at 

118 EAST COLORADO AVENUE 

C. H. Matteson, Proprietor 



Your Eyes Are Priceless! 

Poor and improper lighting 
is the cause of much impaired 
vision 

Eyesight can be safeguarded, 
especially in the home, office, 
factory, or workshop by in- 
stalling proper lighting . . . 

Better Lighting 

means 
Better Seeing 



City of Colorado Springs 

LIGHT and POWER DEPT. 
Utilities Bldg. Phone Main 2400 



IT'S SMART TO 
EAT AT 

Shadburn's 
Restaurant 



COLORADO SPRINGS' 

NEWEST AND 

FINEST 



105 E. Pikes Peak 



SHOE FASHIONS 
AT VORHES 

For Graduation- 



For school wear or outing — 
you'll find it a pleasure to make 
selections here — 




HEADQUARTERS FOR 
RATERNITY and SORORITY 



Fine Watches Quality Silverware 

Perfect Diamonds 

ISAAC BROTHERS 



Main 2252 
129 N. Tejon 



'Priced Reasonable" 



Good Printing 

siness Cards, Envelopes, S 
Business Crca 

H 8C H Printing Co 



Business Cards, Envelopes, Store Sale Bills, Circulars 
Business Creator — See 



C. J. Haasf., Manage 
Odd Fellows Block- 



Main 782 




E. W. HUGHES AND COMPANY 

Investment Securities 

• 

Government Issues 
Listed and Unlisted Bonds and Stocks 



COLORADO SPRINGS 



NEW YORK CITY 



NICHOLSON-FISHBACK 

Above the Chief Theatre 
For Appointments Phone Main 3328-J 



Nineteen Thirty-Seven 

To Colorado College Students: 

We, the staff of the studio, would like to take this 
opportunity to wish you all the best of luck in the future. 

To the seniors; we sincerely wish you every possible 
success in any of the paths before you. 

To the underclassmen; we would like to convey our 
service to each and every one of you, throughout the year. 

Sincerely, 

NICHOLSON-FISHBACK 




GOOD SHOES 
and HOSIERY 



Since 1893 




Sixteenth Street at Welton 

DENVER 



SINTON'S 
MILK 



Since 1880 Colorado Springs Finest 

Phone 
Main 442 



Keep School Memories Fresh Throughout 
the Years with Photographs 

Year after year students have chosen this 
long established studio for their photographs 



PAYTON STUDIO 



30 S. Tejon 

OVER ROBBINS ON THE CORNER 



GIDDINGS Inc. 



A modern department store, 
serving the Region 
satisfactorily for over 
63 years 



JOHNS-MANVILLE SHERWIN WILLIAMS 

ROOFINGS and PAINTS 

ROCK WOOL INSULATION MILL WORK 

WHEN YOU BUILD OR REPAIR 

It will pay you to see us. Our complete stocks of reasonably priced 
building materials are at your service. You will appreciate the quality 
of goods found in our yards. May we furnish you free estimates? 

The CRISSEY & FOWLER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 101 117-129 W. Vermijo 



THE 

MAHAN JEWELRY 
COMPANY 

26 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



$1.00 
a Week 



The 



Buys a new / Uj Typewriter 
Typewriter ^ Man 

Main 95 105 N. Tejon St. 



CARL'S BARBECUE 

26 East Bijou 
BEER • BARBECUED SANDWICHES • WINES 



GAZETTE 

and 

TELEGRAPH CO. 




When you leave College and return to 
your home, either for the summer or 
permanently, as the case may be, let us 
suggest that you keep informed about 
your friends and associates at Colorado 
College by having the Gazette and 
Telegraph mailed to you every day. The 
cost is small. 

MORNING 
EVENING and 
SUNDAY 



We Outfit the Tigers 

SPORTING GOODS 

"Every tiling for Every Sport" 

The BUCK Sporting Goods Co. 

Floyd A. Buck 
Phone Main 930 117 North Tejon St. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
THE 

COLORADO PRINTING AND 
LITHOGRAPHING CO. 

PUEBLO, COLO. 



EVERYTHING FOR YOUR CAR AT A SAVING 

TIRES— BATTERIES— OIL,— ACCESSORIES— SEAT COVERS 



Western Air Patr 
Home Radios 



MOTOROLA 
Auto Radios 



l^sternAutoSupplyOi 

1 200 Stores in the West*-? 



Tools and 
Repair Needs 



132 North Tejon 
Colorado Springs 



Camp Goods 
Fishing Tackle 



Gerald L. Schlessman, '17 Raymond W. Maxwell, '17 O. E. Verner, '18 

Charles W. Wadell, '25 Robert W. Morris, '20 



BROWN, SCHLESSMAN, OWEN AND CO. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



Security Building 
Denver 



Exchange National Bank Bldg. 
Colorado Springs 



Stratton Park Inn 
Bruin Inn 

Same Management 

Parties a Specialty 

RESERVATIONS: MAIN 1104 



We Carry a Complete Line 

of 

BULOVA GRUEN HAMILTON 

WATCHES 

On Terms of $1.00 a Week 

&apelfee's 

CREDIT JEWELERS 
9 South Tejon 



Van Lopik's Drug Store 



CASTLE ROCK, COLORADO 
Your Halfway Stop When Going To Denver 




IXL 

QreameiyCb 




J&lctutQ5 • 



Any information about any phase in 
making any kind of picture always 
forthcoming when you ask here. 

We took this Kodak picture in our 
store (Kodaking girls after infor- 
mation), then sent it back to our 
engraving room where so many 
school annual illustrations are made. 



ALL KODAKS 

ALL KODAK FILMS 
GOOD DEVELOPING 
and PRINTING 
ENLARGING 
FRAMING 

PHOTO ENGRAVING 




17 North Tejon 



THE ULTIMATE GOAL OF EVERY COLLEGE 
MAN IS TO KNOW AND BE KNOWN. KNOW IN 
THE SENSE THAT HE IS WELL EDUCATED- 
AND KNOWN BY HIS REFLECTION OF GOOD 
JUDGMENT. 

FOR YEARS PERKINS-SHEARER HAVE 
MADE THAT GOOD JUDGMENT POSSIBLE 
FOR THE MAN WHO WANTS TO BE 
CORRECTLY DRESSED. 


An Old 
C. C. Custom 

FOR 

MORE 
THAN 

THIRTY 

YEARS 

Meet at Murray's 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

^oBin/onGRiyn 

fflyy g ^ysBB5ijpfain 505 

Colorado/prinqA Colo. 










Another Story! 

— that's our story for you 
this year — for we've added 




Another Story to Our Building 

m !J S . CDoGrloss 

N. Tejon BJf VRN |TVRE ZV. 




The UTE Theatre 

America's Finest Indian Theatre 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Nelson Bros. 
Service Station 



MOBILOIL 



MOBILGAS 



• TIRES 



• BATTERIES • 



31 SOUTH NEVADA 
Main 1234 



The Preferred 
Refreshment 

for any type 
of party or 
luncheon — 

MOWRYS 

MEADOW GOLD 

Ice Creams and Ices 

Extra tempting and delicious through 
the Meadow Gold "Smooth-freeze" 
process. And of course there are 
Meadow Gold Pure Milk and Cream, 
Butter and other pure Dairy Products. 

MOWRY 

Main 

1183 Creamery Co. 

Opposite C. C. Campus 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
THE 

Cheyenne Mt. 
Lodge 



Dancing and Private Parties are 
Suited Individually 



ON THE SUMMIT OF 
CHEYENNE AIT. 



To Maintain the Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 

USE 




m 

CGAJL- 



WHOLESALERS RETAILERS 

PRODUCERS 



THE PIKES PEAK FUEL 



Division of the Golden Cycle Corporation 



Colorado Springs 
Denver, Colorado TELEPHONE MAIN Pueblo, Colorado 

Phone KEystone 7284 W f^r' f^" Phone 505 



S7T 



Cripple Creek District Phone Cripple 8 and Victor 55 



'ONE STOP' 



SERVICE 

THE 

O »\\ KXIKN'T 
WAY 

to obtain 

EXPERT 
ATTENTION 

to your car's needs 

DRIVE IN 
TOMORROW 



117 N<>. N( 



Phone M. 202 



The Prompt Pharmacy 

1 WEST COLORADO AVE. 
Phone Main 1770 



Free Delivery 

Visit Colorado Springs' Most Modern 
SODA FOUNTAIN 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE 

RED 8C WHITE 
STORES 




AT THE SERVICE OF EVERY TIGER 
PHONE US FIRST 

Main 2958 

825 N. Tejon 

Located for Your Convenience 



C. O. "BILL" HOBBS, Your Cleanei 



THE STORE THAT VALUE BUILT 

Stock Brothers 

CORN FED MEATS 

FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

119 East Colorado Avenue 

Phones: Main 4303 - Main 4304 - Main 4305 



Decker Mortuary 

PHONE MAIN 413 

204 NORTH WEBER STREET 

COLORADO SPRINGS 
COLORADO 




THE 

ICE CREAM 

of Colorado Springs 

Tejon Street at Acacia Park 



'Say It With Flou 



The 

Pikes Peak Floral 
Company 



110 N. Tejon St. 



Main 599 



Quality— 



Plumbing 
Heating 



Steam 
Hot Water 
Vapor 
Warm Air 



Air Conditioning 
Iron Fireman 
Sheet Metal Work 
Roofing 



Quality materials and Quality In- 
stallations have made an enviable 
reputation for this organization! 
One that places it first in any one's 
mind who plans on building or 
remodeling. 



Main 
1674 






lurobin p Heatin j Co. 



516 

S. Tejon 



Good Things to Eat 
at Their Very Best 

The Good Things to Eat at Summers are 
assembled from all over the world — the 
choicest selections the markets afford al- 
ways available for better serving. 

113-115 South ^-^ 

£r s " f^artun0M 

^ifrsLtCJ Main 4IOO 



TIGERS! 

we invite you to bring your 
shopping problems to us for 
satisfactory solution . . . 



The Alta Vista Hotel 

COLORADO SPRINGS 

The Most for Your Money 
TRY OUR COFFEE SHOP 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

RECREATION 
BILLIARD PARLOR 

16 E. Pikes Peak 



Mountain States 
Auto Livery 



ALL SCENIC TRIPS 



Special Rates by the Day, or Cars by the Hour 



Phone Main 2000 



M. W. JAMES 

Mgr. 










wmm mffi mmmMm 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



NAME PAGE 

Acme Ticket Co 162 

Alta Vista Hotel 180 

Antler's Hotel 159 

Auto Trades Associate 162 

Barrel's - -.179 

Ben and Eds 165 

Blair's Bus.ness College 164 

Blanchard Jewelry Co 150 

Blick Sporting Goods --..172 

Broadmoor Hotel 155 

Brown. J. S. Mercantile Co 162 

Brown. Schlessman. Owen 6 Co. 172 

Carl's Barbecue 170 

Cave of the Winds 164 

Cheyenne Mt. Lodge ....176 

City of Colorado Springs 166 

City Office Supply 161 

College Cleaners 178 

Collier Lumber Co. 161 

Colorado College 152 

Colorado Laundry 158 

Colorado Printing and Lithographing Co 172 

Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center 160 

Cottrells Clothing Co 164 

Cnssey and Fowler Lumber Co 170 

Dashwood, Rowena _ 162 

Davis. Roy A 170 

Decker Mortuary 179 

Dentan Printing Co. 164 

Dern's 154 

Dieter Bookbinding Co 157 

Dytn 6 Cimino 159 

Enterprise Tent and Awning Co 150 

Feltman 6 Curme Shoe Co 150 

Florman Mfg. Co 165 

Fontius Shoe Co 169 

Gassman Clothing Co 165 

Gazette 6 Telegraph Co 171 

George's Place 151 

Giddings Inc. 170 

Goodbar's 157 

Gray Rose Beauty Shop 151 

Heidelberg's Clothing Co 165 

Hendrie 6 Bolthoff Mfg. Co 150 

Hershey's Barbecue 151 

Heyse Sheet Metal Works 159 

11 6 H Printing Co 167 

Hibbard 6 Co 180 

Honnen. Ed. _ 153 

Howard, lames— Barber Shop 158 

Howard's Cafe 165 

Hughes. E. W.. Investment Co. 167 

Hutchinson Battery Co _ 154 

Ideal Cleaners 161 

Isaac Brothers. Jewelers 167 

1. X. L. Creamery Co __ 172 

Jardine 6 Knight Plumbing and Heating Co. 179 

Kapelke's. Jewelers 172 

KVOR 163 

Lande's 158 

Law Mortuary. The 156 

Levines Book and Stationery Co. _ 158 

Lewis Drug Co 158 

Lorig Clothing Co _ 156 

Lucas, W. I. Sporting Goods 161 



NAME PAGE 

Mahan Jewelry Co 170 

Marr. H. A.. Grocery Co - 178 

Martin's Jewelry Co __ 164 

McCarthy Plumbing Co. 157 

Metal Products Co 151 

Mt. States Auto Livery Co. — 180 

Metzler. John ..150 

Mowry's Creamery Co 176 

Murray Drug Co --174 

Myers. Chuck ...154 

Navajo Hogan 156 

Nelson Brothers 176 

Neufelds. Inc. 151 

Nevada Lunch -161 

Newton Lumber Co 153 

Nicholson Fishback 168-175 

Oak Tavern 162 

Out West Broadcasting Co ....163 

Out West Printing and Stationery Co 181 

Palmer 6 Joslyn. Inc ...161 

Patsy's Pop Corn 161 

Payton Studio's 169 

Pearl Laundry 150 

Peerless Furniture Co 174 

Perkins Auto Trim 165 

Perkins-Shearer Clothing Co. ....174 

Peter Pan Cleaners 158 

Pikes Peak Floral -.179 

Pikes Peak Fuel 177 

Prompt Pharmacy 178 

Recreation Billiard Parlor 180 

Red 6 White -.178 

Robinson Grain Co 174 

Seldomridge Grain Co 154 

Shadburn's Restaurant 167 

Sign of the Rose _ 165 

Simmons Plumbing 6 Heating Co 153 

Sinton Dairy Co 169 

Smith Bros 153 

Sommer's Market 180 

Standley. H. L. 159 

Star-Journal 6 Chieftain 153 

Star Lunch 158 

Stewart Bros. Engraving Co 173 

Stock Bros 179 

Stratton Park Inn 172 

Superior Cleaners 151 

Tipton Studios 164 

Todd's Shoe Shine Parlor 156 

Udick Tire Service -.-- 178 

Upton Gardens 151 

Ute Theatre - 176 

Van Briggle's 165 

Van Lopiks 172 

Vorhes Shoe Co 167 

Walt 6 Ted's 161 

Walter's Brewery _ ....154 

Wandell & Lowe 159 

Waymire's 157 

Western Auto Supply Co. 172 

Western States Grocery Co 158 

Whimpy Snack Shop 158 

Willson's Grocery 151 

Zecha-Donlon-Adams 156 

Zim's Bread Co 156